Can I Plant Weed Seeds In Regular Dirt

Soil is the medium of choice for most cannabis cultivators. Here is what you need to know to get the most out of your soil grow! Growing marijuana in soil is not hard. But to get a good harvest, you must know the best soil to use. Read on to learn how to make your own. i was just wondering if you could just use regular dirt to grow my weed in because i need to make some cash for my baby on the way so yeah i really need to…

Choosing The Best Soil For Cannabis: A Home Grower’s Guide

Growing cannabis in soil is a great way to crop fat, flavoursome buds. Moreover, soil is one of the most forgiving substrates. What are the best soils for growing cannabis? What do you need to know if you want to make your own soil? Our guide answers these questions and more!

Cannabinoids, terpenes, phytochemicals, organic cultivation

Cultivation – Therapeutic Cannabis Use – Advocacy

Home grower’s guide to the best soil for cannabis.

Contents:

  1. What’s the best soil for growing weed?
  2. Traits of quality cannabis soil
  3. Amendments to improve soil quality
  4. Photoperiod vs autoflowering
  5. Store-bought vs homemade
  6. No-till cultivation
  7. Amendments for arid/drought conditions

When growing cannabis, using the right soil is crucial. Unfortunately, sourcing the best soil isn’t always straightforward. From cannabis-specific soils to bargain universal substrates and pre-fertilised types, the sheer amount of options can be overwhelming to novices. And what if you want to make your own soil from scratch?

Let’s talk about the best soil for growing cannabis.

WHAT’S THE BEST SOIL FOR GROWING WEED?

Not every soil is suitable for growing cannabis, and not all cannabis requires the same type of soil. Picking the optimal soil depends on the type of cannabis you’re growing, your climate, whether you’re growing at home or in the wild, etc.

Aside from these factors, there are some common traits among all cannabis soils. Let’s take a look at them:

Texture

Cannabis prefers a light and loose soil texture. A light texture promotes root development, and it ensures more oxygen reaches the roots for optimal growth and health.

Drainage ability

Cannabis soil needs to have excellent drainage. When you water your plants, it shouldn’t pool on top of the soil. If the soil has poor drainage, your plants will get sick and turn out subpar yields, or die.

Water retention

Just as important as good drainage is water retention, which is the soil’s ability to hold water. Good cannabis soil has an optimal balance of water retention and drainage.

pH value

pH is a chemical scale that indicates how acidic or alkaline something is. This is important, as cannabis only does well within a small pH range. A good soil for weed has a pH of about 6.0. A pH of 5.8–6.3 will be fine, but if it fluctuates too far outside of this range, you will get diminished yields. If the pH is seriously off, your plants will die.

Nutrients

Cannabis soil needs to contain nutrients so your plants can grow. Fortunately, almost all soils you can buy already feature them. Know, however, that these nutrients will often last only 3–4 weeks. Around the time your plants start to flower, the nutrients in commercial soils will likely be depleted. This is when you should begin to add nutrients.

If you’re growing without additional nutrients, your soil needs to contain organic substances such as humus, compost, worm castings, guano, etc. Microorganisms in the soil will turn these substances into nutrients for your plants to access on demand.

TRAITS OF QUALITY CANNABIS SOIL

If you’re using store-bought potting mixes, these are already optimally “tuned” for growing. Different story if you’re growing organically, though. Natural soil comes in four varieties: sandy, silty, loamy, and clay. But know that most soils consist of varying ratios of these soil types.

For example, a soil may be clay and loamy, or sandy and silty.

SANDY

Sandy soil is coarse with good drainage, but has poor water retention. When watered, nutrients such as nitrogen will also quickly get washed away. Sandy soil is easy to work with and is a viable choice for cannabis growers.

  • Coarse structure
  • Low pH
  • Pros: Good drainage, keeps soil airy, high oxygen levels, easy to work with
  • Cons: Poor water retention, needs frequent watering

SILTY

Silty soil is a medium-coarse soil type that’s rich in minerals and organic particles. Its water retention is good, yet it has adequate drainage. Silty soils are very easy to work with. The minerals and organic substances within make it one of the most fertile soil types.

  • Medium-coarse
  • Pros: Contains minerals and nutrients, retains water well
  • Cons: Fair drainage

LOAMY

Loamy soil is a combination of sand, silt, and clay soils with added organic compounds. It is one of the best soil types for growing cannabis as it offers optimal water retention and drainage, and it’s rich in nutrients and oxygen. Downside: This type of soil can be expensive.

  • Mixture of sand, silt, and clay
  • Pros: Excellent water retention and drainage, contains nutrients, high oxygen levels
  • Cons: Expensive

Clay soils consist of fine mineral particles. This type of soil is heavy and not easy to work with. It is very rich in nutrients and minerals, which makes it a good option to include in organic grows. Clay soil retains water well, but has poor drainage.

  • Fine particle size
  • High pH
  • Pros: Rich in nutrients, retains water
  • Cons: Poor drainage, heavy and compact, hard to work with

AMENDMENTS TO IMPROVE SOIL QUALITY

If you’re working with natural soil, chances are it won’t be perfect for growing cannabis—not from the start, at least. The texture may not be optimal or it may have poor drainage, for example. But you can improve any type of soil by adding amendments, most of which can be found in your local grow shop.

COCO COIR

Coco coir (coco fibre) is made from coconut husks. These light fibres provide excellent water retention and can lighten compact soils. Some use a pure coco substrate with special nutrients to cultivate their weed. But to amend existing soil, it’s a good idea to add anywhere up to 30% coco coir, depending on the composition of your base soil.

PERLITE

Perlite is the most widely used soil amendment. Perlite consists of very light, bright-white rocks that greatly improve the drainage and airiness of the soil. Perlite also has decent water retention. To amend your soil with it, add 10–15% of perlite. You can add more, but then your soil may become too light and nutrients may leach out. Good-quality commercial soils often come with added perlite.

CLAY PEBBLES

Most cannabis growers are familiar with using clay pebbles as part of a hydroponic setup. But did you know they can also be used to enhance soil structure? Adding clay pebbles to the bottom of your raised beds and containers will assist with drainage and prevent water from pooling at the base—a large risk factor when it comes to root rot.

See also  Do Weed Seeds Have Thc

Growers can also add clay pebbles to the top of containers and beds to serve as a mulch. Here, they help to trap moisture in the growing medium by preventing excess evaporation. Clay pebble mulch also casts shade over the top layer of soil, suppressing weeds and keeping beneficial microbes sheltered from the hot rays of the sun.

VERMICULITE

Vermiculite, just like perlite, is a heat-treated mineral you can use to make your soil lighter.It is also excellent at retaining water. Although vermiculite shares some characteristics with perlite, the two have opposite uses: Use perlite to increase drainage and airiness, and use vermiculite to increase water retention. Luckily, you can use both, as perlite and vermiculite work well together. Around 10% vermiculite is beneficial.

WORM CASTINGS

Worm castings are normally seen more as a nutritional soil amendment as they contain a plethora of useful microorganisms that benefit growth. But worm castings will also improve the texture, drainage, and water retention of your soil. When amending your soil with worm castings, use about 25–30%.

NUTRIENTS

If your DIY cannabis soil is rich in organic material, you will likely not need to add nutrients to it. As a matter of fact, some growers make the mistake of adding manure and vegetable scraps to their soil to “fertilise” it. This results in soil getting “too hot” for the plants, hurting their development in turn. If you want to put your vegetable scraps to good use in your garden, you first need to compost them.

If you think you need to amend your cannabis soil with nutrients, you can easily purchase bottled solutions tailored to a plant’s phase of growth.

Bat Guano

PHOTOPERIOD VS AUTOFLOWERING

One factor to consider when choosing the right soil for your weed is whether you’re growing photoperiod or autoflowering plants. Autoflowers prefer a light mix with fewer added nutrients. A great substrate for your autoflowering ladies is a 50:50 mix of coco coir and a light, peat-based soil with some added perlite for drainage.

When growing autoflowers, stay away from heavily fertilised soils and certain amendments like bat guano, as these will be too hot and overload your plants with nutrients. The same is true for cannabis seedlings, which do not like high levels of nutrients.

Plant autoflowers in their final growing container in a cup-sized hole in the centre of the soil. Fill the hole with seedling/starter soil with no nutrients and place your seed in it. This way, your seedling can grow without being surrounded by the hot soil, which would otherwise burn it.

For photoperiod plants, start them out in small seedling pots/cups with soil that has little to no nutrients. Replant after a few weeks. More mature plants will tolerate higher nutrient levels much better than seedlings.

STORE-BOUGHT VS HOMEMADE

If you’ve just started growing cannabis, it may be best to simply get ready-made soil from the grow store. The reason for this is that good-quality cannabis soil normally contains everything your plants need for healthy growth, in the optimal ratios. If you want, you can further improve your store-bought soil with a handful of perlite for increased drainage, but otherwise you should be good.

BASIC CANNABIS SOIL RECIPE

On the other hand, there may come a time when you want to make your own soil. After all, why spend good money on soil if your homemade version is even better? Here is a recipe for a basic homemade cannabis soil.

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 part vermiculite
  • 1 part coco coir peat
  • 2 parts compost
  • ½–1 cup worm castings (or humus)
DIRECTIONS
  1. Sieve the compost to remove larger chunks.
  2. Soak the coco coir peat in warm water. Check the directions of the product to see what kind of volume you will be getting.
  3. Use a bucket and mix the coco coir peat with the vermiculite.
  4. Add the compost.

Done! Double-check the pH value of your homemade soil. It should be in the range of 5.8–6.3.

The above is a basic soil recipe that will serve you well for most grows, indoors and outdoors. But you can further enhance your soil mix by adding organic fertilisers.

Bat guano is an excellent and inexpensive organic fertiliser for flowering marijuana. You can add it to a soil mix or spread it on the topsoil and water in later. You can also look into time-release nutrients such as Easy Boost Organic Nutrition pellets. Add a cup of these to your soil to feed your plants for their whole life cycle—100g is enough for 2–3 cannabis plants. All that’s left to do is water!

NO-TILL CULTIVATION

No-till cultivation is a gardening method that allows the soil to remain undisturbed (no digging, stirring, overturning, etc.). This way, microorganisms in the soil can create a thriving ecosystem that replenishes the soil with good bacteria, helpful fungi, and other living organisms. No-till cultivation promotes organic matter retention and water absorption because nutrients are constantly being recycled throughout the soil.

To learn about no-till cultivation and its benefits, check out this article!

AMENDMENTS FOR ARID/DROUGHT CONDITIONS

If you’re growing outdoors in a hot climate such as Southern Spain or a similar location, you don’t want to “cook” the root zone of your plants. If you’re using pots, choose white plastic containers, as these help to keep the soil temperature at a reasonable level under the beating sun. You can also look to air pots or smart pots to keep the roots of your cannabis plants cool. As an additional measure to protect the soil from fluctuating temperatures, you can add layers of dry straw onto the topsoil.

If you’re growing in drought conditions where your plants may at times go weeks without rain, or if you can’t make daily trips to your guerrilla grow location, use water-absorbent polymers to keep them hydrated! You can get these from hydroponic grow stores or can cut them out of diapers.

For a guerrilla grow in dry conditions, dig a hole about 60cm deep and 30cm in diameter. Add a few cups of polymer crystals to the bottom of the soil mix and fill up with the remaining soil. Place your plant into the soil and water liberally. As your plant grows, the roots will soon reach the polymers so it can drink even during drought. Tip: Soak the polymers in a light nutrient solution for a double benefit!

How to grow marijuana in soil

Growing marijuana in soil has many advantages. For instance, it is the best way for buds to develop an excellent aromatic flavor which a lot of people love. Also, most growers still prefer to plant weed using soil. In essence, using the right type of soil, the resulting harvest will be more rewarding.

Information about growing marijuana in soil

While hydroponics allows cannabis to grow efficiently and fast, it also has some drawbacks. One is that it is costly to set up the whole system. Also, it needs a lot of expertise to make the method work. On the other hand, the practice of using soil comes naturally, and it only takes a little research to learn.

See also  When To Transplant Weed Seeds From Paper Towel

So, in this article, we will cover the best soil for growing weed in both indoor and outdoor gardens. It includes recognizing the quality of soil, and knowing what supplies are best to use. Also, we share the recipe for making the best soil for marijuana plants.

In essence, we show how easy it is to assure nutrient balance within the medium. Using the best soil from the start helps lessen the need to pump chemical nutrients into the plant along the way. Also, this increases the chances of a healthy harvest of high-quality buds.

The basics of marijuana soil

Before we get into making the ideal marijuana soil, we will need to learn the basics.

Why grow in soil?

There are many reasons why soil is the best medium for weeds. It is ideal for germinating, transplanting, or letting the plant grow. Here are the benefits, and disasters that could happen with using soil.

Advantages of using soil

The soil is the most natural medium for growing almost all kinds of plants. It means that most people already are familiar with or have experience in doing it. In effect, it is easier and less stressful to use than other modes of planting, which requires a learning curve.

Another advantage is its simplicity in making it work. Just watering the soil is enough for most plants to grow. Also, the supplies needed are few compared to using other costlier mediums.

Learn how to grow marijuana in soil when you download my free marijuana Grow Bible!

  • Grow with my Quick Start Guide
  • Discover secrets to Big Yields
  • Avoid common grow mistakes
Disadvantages of Using Soil

Since soil is an organic material, it is natural for bugs to live in it. Therefore, the plants are more prone to suffer from pest infestations.

There is also the issue of slower growth. In contrast, marijuana grown using hydroponics enjoys explosive growth due to faster and more efficient nutrient absorption.

What is high-quality soil?

The best type of soil can hold an amount of water that is many times its weight. It also holds the water for a certain degree of time before evaporating. Such characteristics are essential as plants need time to absorb the water.

Regarding appearance, we want to look for a loose texture that stays the same when wet or dry. It should also be dense enough for the roots to take hold, but at the same time, allow air to pass through.

What is the best soil for marijuana?

So, what exactly is the best soil for cannabis? The truth is, the plant acts exactly like weeds. It means that it is not very picky when it comes to its medium of growth. In fact, marijuana can grow fairly well in soil that is naturally disturbed. As such, it can pop up and thrive in places where the soil has experienced natural calamity or human movements.

But if the goal is to produce buds with a high amount of THC, the grower has to choose high-quality soil. Veteran producers know that the best soil has the right balance of nutrients and acid levels. Not only that, but soil requirements vary in each growing stage.

To be specific, the ideal soil for marijuana has a lot of nitrogen during the vegetative stage. But as the cannabis progresses to the flowering stage, the need for nitrogen goes down. If the nitrogen level in the soil stays the same, this could result in small buds that are less potent. As such, constant monitoring of nutrients is vital.

When it comes to pH level, most plants can do with 6.0. A range between 5.8 and 6.3 is okay, but too high or too low pH may be disastrous to the crop. As a result, the buds tend to be of poor quality.

What supplies do we need?

To get started, we must find materials that help the seed grow in the right track. It means adequate nutrients and water for germination. For this purpose, it is a whole lot easier if we use peat plugs. But potting mix and composted manure can also do the trick.

Peat plugs

Known also as peat pellets, these are small cylindrical seed holders covered in mesh. They give seeds a great start as they come complete with nitrogen and ideal pH level. Any garden shop sells peat plugs that come with a terrarium and small trays.

Since water evaporates fast when using peat plugs, be careful not to let it go dry. Seeds need plenty of water to grow, so it is important to keep the soil moist.

Potting mix

A great option to use when peat plugs are not available is potting soil or potting compost. This material is a mix of different ingredients that provide food for growing seeds.

An important thing to remember when using potting mix is to watch out for clumps. If not removed, marijuana plants may have a hard time rooting. So, make sure the potting soil is light and fluffy. Also, look for a brand that has peat moss, pine bark, and perlite or vermiculite. These things improve the quality of the soil by adjusting its pH level and nitrogen content.

Composted Manure

Another option is to use composted manure. It has plenty of nutrients and nourishment. Also, it is effortless to make at home.

While manure is readily available in some gardens, it will take 4 to 6 weeks to turn it into a suitable material. Mixed with soil, it acts as a fertilizer to plants. And unlike other additives, using animal wastes does not build up in the soil. Instead, it helps keep the medium organic.

What is Super Soil?

A new type of soil called Super Soil is fast gaining popularity among cannabis growers nowadays. This medium, made by Subcool, is by far the best soil for growing marijuana.

An advantage of using Super Soil is that it already has the right nutrients and acid balance. As such, all that growers need to do is water the plants. But keep in mind that this type of soil is not suitable for seedlings as it may burn them.

As it happens, Subcool shared the recipe on how to make Super Soil. But while this “hack” sounds very appealing, it requires intense research to make. Also, there are some problems with bugs and pests growing in the soil if not properly done. Moreover, it takes a dozen ingredients to make so it can be quite expensive.

While we can easily buy Super Soil in garden supply centers, there is no harm in trying to make it. Especially since we can use organic materials at home.

How to make Super Soil for marijuana

Ever since the secret about Super Soil came out, growers are using it to produce top-shelf organic buds. While it is ideal for large producers who aim for bigger yields, small-time home growers can also try making it.

In 3 steps, here is what we need to prepare and do to make our own Super Soil.

See also  Can Dogs Smell Weed Seeds

Step 1. Base

Prepare high-quality organic potting mix. The recommended amount is 8 x 30 pounds.

Step 2. Additives

Here are the things to combine with the potting mix to create a super-charged soil.

2.1. Azomite

This material comes from volcanic rock and contains over 70 minerals and trace elements. Since it contains gold, copper, silver, and calcium, to name a few, its basic use is to remineralize the soil. Having abundant, diverse minerals is a good way to ensure the health of the plants.

The recommended amount is 1/2 cup.

2.2. Bat Guano

Bat feces is a rich source of nitrogen. Also, it comes with an outstanding balance of other minerals such as phosphorous and potassium. Most importantly, it does not leave any metallic taste on the buds like other additives.

The recommended amount is 5 pounds.

2.3. Blood Meal

This additive is not vegan-friendly, but it is an excellent source of nitrogen. Made from the dried blood of mostly cows, it seems like an unpleasant idea for fertilizer. But it is a popular gardening product that increases the growth of cannabis during the vegetative phase.

The recommended amount is 5 pounds.

2.4. Bone Meal

During the flowering phase, the fine powder of animal bones provides phosphorous for more and bigger blooms. Just be cautious of this ingredient if there are vegans who use the buds.

The recommended amount is 5 pounds.

2.5. Dolomite or Sweet Lime

Rich in calcium and magnesium, this mineral rock prevents organic nutrients from escaping the soil. It also keeps the pH level from being too acidic.

The recommended amount is 1 cup.

2.6. Epsom Salt

Magnesium aids in nutrient absorption. It also happens that Epsom Salt is rich in this mineral. Thus, we use it to avoid deficiency. But be careful in adding it. As with all other additives, too much of a good thing can be bad.

The recommended amount is 3/4 cup.

2.7. Kelp or Humid Acid

Fungi are important in the soil’s pH level, so we use kelp or Humid Acid to feed them.

The recommended amount is two tablespoons for humic acid and 1/4 cup kelp meal for every five gallons of the material.

can i use regular dirt to grow my weed in

i was just wondering if you could just use regular dirt to grow my weed in because i need to make some cash for my baby on the way so yeah i really need to know. please help? thank you.

ChicoGranjero
Well-Known Member

regular dirt. no telling whats in that stuff. at the very least go to your local lowe’s or home depot and grab some of that miracle grow 3 month release mix for 10 bucks that should do the trick much better than common dirt. common dirt is just a lil too iffy if u want a decent yield. just my 2 cents.

congrats on the baby btw

jesus of Cannabis

regular dirt dosent have the nutrients that other specialty soils will have. To answer your question, yes you can, but for $5 a bag at Lowes pick up some Miracle grow.

You have a kid on the way and you are growing weed for $$?
I am not a saint or a preacher, but the consequences of getting caught. just sounds a little too risky.

mazpot
Active Member

you can put it on the oven for 30mins around 250 degrees. also add some stuff to it. its a waste of time just buy some soil.

AquafinaOrbit
Well-Known Member

No. In nature weed developed the trait of only being able to grow in dirt you buy from a store.

Id suggest getting a bag of perlite though. Possibly some peat moss depending on the soil you got around you. But yeah of course it can, that is where it came from originally don’t forget.

djaylp
Member

yeah aint no one hiring where i am right now. and my girl is pregnat so this is what i gotta do. ive dealt before just never grown before.

Pot3r
Member

yea, and listen to there advice, i tried to skip on the soil just thinking dirt is dirt, but after the bugs, and the slow growth do to it getting to hard, and poor drainage . i had to buy all new dirt and re transplant everything , wish i just woulda started with it.

but thats my experience

diamond doggy
New Member

yeah regular dirt is fine, thats what i grow mine in and they are great, but i planted them late.. but i mixed some nutrients in with mine..

johnny961
Well-Known Member
djaylp
Member

thank you guys.keep the ideas comminy oh also i put my good seeds in a damn rag and put them in a dark area about70-75 degrees cause my friend told me to do that before i plant them.when should i take them out of the damn rag

djaylp
Member

first grow yes but first time dealing no. i got connections i just want to grow my own so i can cut back on the money i got to spend on a oz or 8 ball and just grow my own.

Bubba Kushman
Well-Known Member

Welcome to RIU! You dont want to use regular dirt indoors. It gets compact and does not drain and Its a waste of time. You will have bugs and weeds growing in the crap and running around your growroom! You wont be happy! Fox Farms Ocean Forest or your own mix is the best. If you cant afford it make sure whatever dirt you get has been sterilized. Miracle Grow works but I dont like to smoke Synthetic fertilizers myself. Good Luck!

djaylp
Member

thank you and im growing it outdoors in about 250 acres of land where my buddy lives and hes gonna watch over it for me.

ChicoGranjero
Well-Known Member

thank you guys.keep the ideas comminy oh also i put my good seeds in a damn rag and put them in a dark area about70-75 degrees cause my friend told me to do that before i plant them.when should i take them out of the damn rag

omg dude. dont depend on this to be a get rich quick scheme or even make some chump change your first go round. it takes time to learn. seems like you havent grown any type of plant in your life. i dont think you should depend on this to make u the money you need. just being realistic my friend.

growing outside on that much acreage. u need to make sure wild animals wont tear that shit up. rabbits love that stuff. especially when they are tender lil shoots. so many things can go wrong that can only be learned through experience. READ READ READ. you need to start with reading some journals on here and grow guides it’ll answer so many of your questions.

i like to get em started by dropping them in a cup of water and put that cup in a dark area. as soon as those babies crack put them in some germinating soil WITH NO FERTILIZERS. give it two weeks in that and then move em to the miracle grow dirt. good luck