Found A Seed In My Dispensary Weed

ILGM

Buy Cannabis Seeds Online

Seed-to-Sale (Metrc) OMMA uses Metrc for the statewide seed-to-sale inventory tracking system. All OMMA-licensed businesses must be fully Metrc-compliant. Quick Links Information for You just picked up a new strain that you've been waiting to try. The moment you get home, you rip into the package and take in its smell. When you dive in I love seedless weed. It’s just so easy. But now, instead of grumbling on the rare occasions when I find a marijuana seed, I get excited.

Seed-to-Sale (Metrc)

OMMA uses Metrc for the statewide seed-to-sale inventory tracking system. All OMMA-licensed businesses must be fully Metrc-compliant.

Quick Links

  • Information for All Commercial Licensees
  • Information for Dispensaries
  • Getting Started
  • Required and Optional Training
  • Monthly Reporting
  • Zero Inventory
  • FAQs
  • Important Dates
  • Contact OMMA or Metrc
  • Agreed Order (Court Document)
  • NCS Analytics
  • Pay My Fine
  • OMMA-Metrc News and Updates

All Commercial Licensees

EVERY commercial licensee must be fully Metrc-compliant. The deadline for full compliance was May 26.

ALL seeds, plants and products must be tagged and tracked in Metrc, except for dispensaries selling or transferring untagged products (see more in the Dispensaries section below).

Every licensee must be registered with Metrc. The owner or key administrator must have completed the New Business training offered every weekday and on-demand in Metrc Learn.

Once credentialed, licensees log in and access the Support page to find on-demand, self-paced learning modules for additional training.

Dispensaries

Like all commercial licensees, dispensaries must be fully Metrc-compliant. The deadline was May 26.

The deadline to sell or dispose of untagged inventory outside of Metrc was Aug. 24. Use the OMMA Monthly Reporting Template to report untagged sales. The final report, reflecting untagged sales Aug. 1-24, is due Sept. 15.

Getting Started

To begin using Metrc, sign up for training to get credentialed. See more in the Required and Optional Training section below.

Required and Optional Training

Required Training

The owner or key administrator of each commercial license is required to take Metrc’s New Business class to become credentialed in Metrc.

Licensees can use the Metrc scheduler to sign up for New Business training, offered each weekday. The class is also offered on demand through Metrc Learn in your Metrc account.

When you complete the training, reach out to Metrc’s Support team to get credentialed.

Optional Training

Licensees already credentialed in Metrc can take advanced training courses in Metrc Learn and using the Metrc scheduler. Metrc also has has helpful information for licensees in the Metrc Knowledge Center.

Without a Metrc login, you can also watch training videos on its Oklahoma web page and its YouTube channel on the following topics (and many others):

Monthly Reporting

Metrc meets the monthly reporting requirements and the template is no longer necessary for sales, transports and waste disposal.

Businesses reporting zero inventory must continue submitting monthly reports using the OMMA Monthly Reporting Template until zero inventory reporting is available in Metrc.

Zero Inventory

Businesses with zero inventory must still be credentialed in Metrc. Until zero inventory reporting is available in Metrc, the business needs to continue submitting monthly reports in the current system.

For a comprehensive list of frequently asked questions, please view this searchable PDF.

How do I get started in Metrc and sign up for training?

The owner or key administrator of each commercial license is required to take Metrc’s New Business class to become credentialed in Metrc.

Licensees can use the Metrc scheduler to sign up for New Business training, offered each weekday. The class is also offered on demand through Metrc Learn in your Metrc account.

When you complete the training, reach out to Metrc’s Support team to get credentialed.

What if I missed the Aug. 24 deadline for untagged dispensary sales and disposal?

What if I missed the July 25 deadline for COAs or testing notes to be added to my Beginning Inventory?

The deadline for testing labs to enter testing results and attach the COA for items in a business’s beginning inventory or for testing information to be added to the notes for those items in a dispensary’s inventory was July 25, 2022. All products transferred from growers and processors should include the testing results and COA in Metrc. All tagged products at a dispensary should already have the testing results and COA in Metrc or include the testing information in the notes section. If any products do not meet these requirements, they must be re-tested, and the testing laboratory must enter the test results and upload the new COA into Metrc. There will be no extension of the July 25 deadline.

What do I do if Metrc can’t verify my license or says it isn’t active?

If Metrc is unable to find your license, request a ticket number from Metrc Support. Then send an email to [email protected] with the licensee’s name, the business name, the business license number and the Metrc ticket number. Our vendors are working on a permanent solution to this problem, but in the meantime, we can help troubleshoot and potentially fix it manually.

See also  Blue Dream Cannabis Seeds

Can businesses legally dispose of unsold, untagged products?

The deadline was May 26 for growers and processors to sell or legally dispose of untagged products, or bring them inside Metrc using the beginning inventory process. The deadline was Aug. 24 for dispensaries to sell or legally dispose of untagged products. Send an email to [email protected] if you missed those deadlines.

Do I still need to be in Metrc if my business is non-operational?

Yes. All commercial licensees are required to be credentialed in Metrc. Businesses reporting zero inventory will need to continue submitting monthly reports in the current system until zero inventory reporting is available in Metrc.

Do I still have to complete monthly reports for OMMA?

My manifests in Metrc don’t include batch numbers. What do I do?

We are working closely with Metrc to amend the transfer manifest. The revised manifest will be available soon. Until then, commercial licensees can handwrite harvest and production batch numbers on the manifest before transporting medical marijuana product(s) from the originating licensee’s premises. Per OAC 310:681-3-6(g), the manifest may not be altered after that point, except to add printed names, titles and signatures of any personnel accepting delivery on behalf of the receiving licensee, to document the refusal of a medical marijuana or medical marijuana product delivery, or if delivery becomes impossible after leaving the originating licensee’s premises. OMMA commercial licensees shall not accept any incoming transfers until after the shipment, contents and batch numbers have been physically received and verified, the physical manifest has been signed, and all other requirements are met.

How do I enter and submit testing samples in Metrc?

OMMA Chief Science Officer Lee Rhoades explains how to properly enter and submit testing primary testing samples in this YouTube video. It’s important to also submit a reserve sample using the same process — be sure to make the reserve sample a regular package in Metrc, not a test package. Get full details in this bulletin from Metrc.

What happens to businesses that aren’t compliant?

Violations are subject to administrative action. Businesses that aren’t compliant will receive instructions via certified mail and email.

Why is Metrc the seed-to-sale provider for Oklahoma?

Oklahoma requested proposals for a statewide seed-to-sale tracking system provider. A single, statewide provider provides industrywide standardization that makes it more efficient to track activity in the medical marijuana market.

I Found a Seed in My Bag of Cannabis. Can I Grow It?

You just picked up a new strain that you’ve been waiting to try. The moment you get home, you rip into the package and take in its smell. When you dive in deeper, you spot something buried within the bud. It’s small, round, and has an outer casing.

Congratulations, you’ve found a seed. More specifically a bagseed, as the seeds found in packaged or bagged flower are commonly called.

Maybe congratulations aren’t quite in order. Depending on where it came from, who you ask, and if the seed is viable or not will affect your level of excitement.

While finding a seed in your stash is not ideal for truly exceptional flower and much less common than it once was, it is a pretty ordinary occurrence. Anyone who has been smoking cannabis for some time has undoubtedly come across a bagseed. Sometimes you’ll notice one when grinding down some flower or you’ll see it pop, spark, and crackle as the heat of your lit bowl pops the precious kernel within.

Ok, so you found a bagseed. Now what?

Is Bagseed Good or Bad?

Seeds found in finished cannabis flower can develop for a number of reasons. A nearby male plant can accidentally pollinate a flowering female. More commonly, though, they’re a sign of stress and can be attributed to high temperatures during the final stages of flowering or an exaggerated spike in climate or environment.

Seeds can also form in plants with genetic disorders or instability, like hermaphrodites–plants that develop both male and female reproductive parts. Generally these conditions are viewed as negatives, and for that reason alone, temper your expectations with any plants you start from a bagseed.

If found before lighting it on fire, the first thought from excited smokers is: “Let’s grow some weed!” But before you jump in headfirst, ask yourself a few questions to help decide if it’s worth the time and energy to grow the seed.

Was the Seed Found in Good Cannabis?

The first and most apparent question you should ask yourself is whether you enjoy the cannabis that the seed turned up in. If you don’t like the flavor, effects, or even the looks of the bud, then it’s probably not worth growing.

See also  How To Store Weed Seeds

Strains like the legendary Chemdog wouldn’t be possible without adventurous smokers planting and proliferating the seeds they found in a bag.

Sometimes you’ll get lucky and find a mature seed in some really nice herb. Strains like the legendary Chemdog wouldn’t be possible without adventurous smokers planting and proliferating the seeds they found in a bag of kind bud.

So don’t discount your bud just because there’s a seed or two in it. While not ideal, it could be the origins of the next great cannabis strain.

Are You Ready to Grow?

Growing cannabis takes a certain level of commitment. Plants need nurturing for months in the right environment with a close eye for detail. All this takes investment. Whether it’s time, energy, or financial resources, you’ll have to commit to the whole process if you want to produce something you’re proud of.

Fear not! If you’re simply curious to learn how cannabis grows and less concerned with the overall outcome, you can plant a couple of bagseeds outside and see what the result are.

If you’re ready for a more serious approach, make sure you have the space for a proper garden and pop the seeds to see what fruit they bear. That is, if the seeds you found are viable.

Is the Seed Viable?

If you like the strain and you’re ready to grow, then it comes down to whether or not the seed is viable, or able to successfully germinate. For a seed to be viable, it must be mature enough to have a completely formed genetic blueprint and it must be strong enough to “pop” through its hard casing and sprout its crucial tap root.

Immature seeds tend to be light in color and have a soft outer shell.

Stress on a plant and unstable environments can produce bagseeds, and often, a bagseed’s viability is questionable at best.

There are a few indicators that will give you a sense of whether the seed is worth germinating. Immature seeds tend to be light in color and have a soft outer shell.

Visual signs like tiger stripes–dark stripes that resemble tiny roots or veins on a leaf–are generally good. A seed with a solid shell will withstand a little pressure when pinched between your fingers. If it crumbles or cracks, the seed will be effectively destroyed, but don’t agonize over your loss.

In some cases, even if a seed isn’t completely mature, there’s still a chance it could be viable. But often these are extremely weak, take long to develop, and express other unfavorable characteristics. Growers usually discard weak plants to free up space in their limited gardens.

However, I’ve watched seeds that I had zero faith in their ability to germinate turn into strong, healthy plants–but that isn’t common.

You might also find a mature seed that has been physically damaged through poor handling, like rough trimming. In those cases, it probably isn’t worth the effort to try and germinate the seed.

But if the seeds you found look decent or even questionable, you might as well germinate them and see what sprouts.

Time to Germinate

Viable or not, there’s only one sure way to find out. Once you’ve decided you’re going to see what those beans can do, it’s time to germinate. Germination is the incubation period that encourages seeds to sprout and develop into a new plant.

There are a number of different ways you can germinate cannabis seeds, but they all require the same things to be successful: water, heat, and air. For a complete, step-by-step guide, check out our article How to Germinate Cannabis Seeds.

Even if your seed sprouts fast and grows vigorously, it has roughly a 50/50 chance of being female and producing seedless, cannabinoid-rich flowers.

Remember, once a seed germinates, the real work begins. Sexing, selecting, vegetative growth, flowering, and the eventual harvest all lie ahead.

What To Do If You Find Seeds In Your Weed

When I lived in the Midwest, I would drive 70 miles each way to buy weed. I would buy whatever strain my dealer had. And I knew I’d end up with a lot of marijuana seeds.

Like most smokers, I wanted as much smokeable bud as possible, and seeds always felt like a net loss. I couldn’t smoke them. I couldn’t use them to grow my own plant (not in Indiana, anyway). So I threw them away.

After moving to Boulder, I almost forgot about seedy cannabis.

I would stop by Karing Kind dispensary every week or two, buying anywhere from an eighth to an ounce, and over the years I have found fewer than five seeds in my weed.

Pounds and pounds of clean-grown, top-shelf bud… five total seeds. That’s an incredible track record!

But as I’ve come to appreciate, finding seeds in your weed doesn’t have to be a bad thing. The occasional seed hardly affects how much flower you have to smoke, and with a little effort it has the potential to turn into your very own pot plant. Hooray! Free weed!

See also  Germinating Marijuana Seeds In Jiffy Pots

I still love seedless marijuana. It’s just so easy to grind and smoke. But now, instead of grumbling on those rare occasions when I find a seed, I get excited.

Seed Be Gone: Top-Shelf Cannabis Grown With the Best Available Methods

The plants grown in Karing Kind’s garden are carefully monitored and cared for. Male plants are removed prior to pollination, and female plants are nurtured to reduce stress, which limits the occurrence of self-pollinating hermaphroditic plants.

This all goes to ensure the bud you buy is as potent and dense as possible, with limited stems and almost no seeds. And that means more smokeable marijuana.

Of course, after more than a year without finding even a single seed in my cannabis, I began to rethink my resistance to seedy weed.

After all, Colorado residents are allowed to grow their own cannabis plants for personal use… shouldn’t I be actively hoping for seeds that I could try to turn into my own source of top-shelf marijuana?

Are Cannabis Seeds from Recreational Dispensary Bud Worth Growing?

Who wouldn’t want a chance at growing their own marijuana, especially when you know you’re getting a favorite strain and what potency and effects you can expect?

But seeds you find in store-bought weed are not the same as seeds that have been stabilized over time. In some cases, seeds won’t maintain the potency, yield or fragrance of the original plant. This potential change in quality is why many growers prefer to use clones.

That doesn’t mean you should just throw out seeds you find!

It’s still a free cannabis seed with the potential to produce a high-yielding plant you couldn’t grow otherwise. No, it might not end up being an exact clone of the strain you found it in. But when you’re starting with top-shelf bud, even a slight shift in the next generation’s quality will yield potent, flavorful flower.

Try to get your seed to sprout, and give it time to flower before deciding whether to maintain that plant or move on to greener pastures.

What Do Viable Marijuana Seeds Look Like?

The only sure way to know if a seed is viable is to try to germinate and see if it sprouts.

Generally speaking, viable seeds are darker and relatively hard. Even if a seed is pale and easy to crush between your fingers, however, it’s worth trying to get a sprout before giving up on the seed as nonviable.

What’s the Difference Between Seeds You Find and Seeds You Buy?

When you buy seeds from a trusted breeder, like those sold at Karing Kind recreational marijuana dispensary in Boulder, you can expect they will carry the same properties of the “mother” plant. That’s because these seeds have been carefully stabilized over generations.

The seeds you find in store-bought marijuana flower aren’t even supposed to be there. That doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with the seeds you find… there’s just a little more room for variations in the quality and yield of the plant the seed grows.

Even when buying seeds from trusted breeders, there isn’t any guarantee your plant will exactly mirror the mother plant. Your growing method, soil, temperature, lights and dozens of other factors can all impact the yield, smell and potency of the plant.

Learn more about how to set up your home grow , and let us know in the comments if you have turned any “unwanted” seeds into your very own cannabis plant.

To Seed or Not to Seed…

The only time I have a green thumb is after eating lime jello. I once managed to kill a cactus. If I’m going to try my hand at growing something again, it may as well be with free cannabis seeds.

Because of their attention to detail and careful growing methods, you aren’t likely to find seeds in the flower you buy at Karing Kind. Just pure, top-shelf marijuana. But i f you do find a seed, why not see how it grows? You could end up with your very own cannabis plant and a free, ongoing supply of top-shelf flower.

Or – if you want to ensure the most bud for your effort – you can buy stabilized seeds from Freeworld Genetics for pickup at Karing Kind in North Boulder.

While we carry a variety of strains, concentrates, edibles, salves and tinctures, inventory and stock levels fluctuate from week to week and month to month. Check our menu and follow us on Twitter for an up-to-date list of edibles, concentrates and buds available.

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 5 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.