Germinate cannabis seed 80 degrees

Germination Cannabis Seeds

Germinating your cannabis seeds is the first step to getting your crop under way. It is the process in which life within the seed is stimulated, turning it from a seed into a sprout.

There are three main stimuli that trigger germination; Water, air and warmth. All three must be present for the cannabis seed to successfully grow. The first is water; the seed goes through a process called “imbibing”, this is where the seed soaks up water around it, eventually causing the seeds shell to split as the embryo inside expands. The second factor which is required to trigger germination is air. This will ensure that the embryo that it has what it requires to perform photosynthesis and transpiration. Finally the cannabis seed needs a degree of warmth to trigger growth. The embryo contained within the seed has a small store of food to get itself going; it just needs these indicators to give it the go-ahead.

As your cannabis seeds take their first steps into life they will develop a tap root, which bursts through the shell of the seed. As it continues to grow it will produce 2 small embryonic leaves known as the cotyledons; these will push off the remainder of the seed shell – do not attempt to remove it yourself, you are likely to do more damage than good. When these leaves appear it is very important to start providing the seedling as much light as possible, allowing it to start its process of photosynthesis, which produces the fuel for its future growth.

There are a few methods by which you can germinate you cannabis seeds, some of which are more reliable than others. It is generally recommended as a novice cultivator, that if you have 10 seeds start by germinating 5, followed by the other 5 the following week. This will ensure that if you spoil your first batch due to poor technique, you will still have some seeds left to try again. If you are confident in your skills, and you have done this a few times, then there is no reason not to do them all at once.

Generally speaking, cannabis seeds germinate best in temperatures of 69-80 degrees Fahrenheit (21-27 degrees Celsius), and will take around 2-7 days to germinate. Although many believe otherwise, it is fine to have your seeds germinate in daylight.

Extra Tips:

If you buy low quality/immature seeds then you are not likely to get very good success rates, no matter how experienced you are. Indicators of a bad seed can be a pale whiteness in color, but this can also be the appearance of some specific strains – so do some research or contact your seed bank if they have sent you white seeds you were not expecting.

Other factors that can cause cannabis seed germination to fail are incorrect pH levels, seed exposure/drying out, the incorrect depth, over feeding, physical damage or bad soil. Take care where you store you germinating seeds as well; for example, a cold draft could end up damaging your seeds, causing the growth to be stunted.

If you are growing in soil then refrain from the urge to uncover your seeds to see how they are doing – no matter how long you think they are taking. It will do more harm than good, as you can damage young roots.

Finally, some strains of cannabis can grow with fairly weak stems. If you notice your seedlings leaning to the side, prop them up with a small stick until they are stronger. Never use a stick from the outside; they can bring in unwanted, negative variables such as pests.

How to germinate cannabis seeds

So, you’ve decided to grow your own cannabis plants. You purchased a pack of seeds, assembled cultivation materials, cleared a space in your garden, and are ready to grow your first cannabis crop . With everything in hand, it’s time to begin the very first step of cannabis cultivation : germinating seeds.

What is germination?

Germination is the first stage of the cannabis growth cycle : the process that brings a cannabis seed out of its hibernation period and starts the cannabis growth process. After all, seeds in a bag don’t spontaneously start developing roots. Also known as “popping” seeds, seed germination begins when a seed receives environmental cues letting it know the setting is perfect to start growth.

Germination is the process that brings a cannabis seed out of its hibernation period and starts the cannabis growth process. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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When a seed enters an environment with enough moisture, it will increase in size and slowly break out of its shell. A seedling or germ forms from which roots will emerge, helping the baby plant absorb nutrients from the soil. Seeds naturally develop roots facing down and stems stretching upward, allowing the young cannabis plant to simultaneously feed off light and earth.

It’s essential to acquire high-quality cannabis seeds for germination, as these will go on to become high-quality cannabis plants. Seeds that are fresh-feeling or too green indicate that they haven’t reached full maturity, while pale-green, white, or very dark cannabis seeds may have trouble sprouting. However, it’s tricky to know the outcome of a popped seed, so trying may be worthwhile. If you’re not ready to pop your seeds yet, store them in a dark, cool place until it’s time for germination.

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Preparing to germinate cannabis seeds

Germination itself is a crucial aspect of cannabis cultivation. The seed germination process is the foundation of every marijuana plant, and steps can be taken to boost successful popping. For example, some cultivators improve germination attempts by soaking seeds in 1% hydrogen peroxide or a compost tea for 12 hours beforehand to kill any dangerous pests.

The environment in which seeds germinate also plays a role in the outcome. While there are several different germination methods, each requires proper moisture, minimal handling, and warm springtime temperatures between 68-72 degrees Fahrenheit.

How to germinate cannabis seeds

The best germination method depends on the cultivator’s choice. Here are some of the most common ways to pop your cannabis seeds.

How to germinate seeds in soil

Soil is an easy, more natural method with which to germinate your cannabis seeds. The soil protects the fragile roots from any interference, and soil is, after all, where a cannabis plant would grow in the wild.

Soil is an easy, more natural method with which to germinate your cannabis seeds because the soil protects the fragile roots from any interference. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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First, make sure you use the correct type of soil, either gently fertilized potting soil or a seed starter with a pH level of approximately six (6). The soil contains the right acidity and enough nutrients to strengthen your young cannabis plants for the first two weeks. Be careful not to add more nutrients, or you risk overfeeding and killing your seeds.

Place the soil in a small pot and use your finger or a pencil to push a small hole in the dirt, a bit more than half an inch deep. Insert the seed into the hole and bury it with soil. From this point on, don’t touch your seed. The young plant is fragile and knows how to position itself in the soil bed.

Gently water the soil with a spray bottle and situate your pots under a fluorescent lamp. Keep seeds away from the windowsill, as the temperature is too volatile for germination. In general, you’ll want to keep the temperature in the range of 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Monitor your soil every day and keep it moist. Within four to seven days, you should see tiny stems sprouting from the soil.

When the seedling stems reach two to four inches in height, it’s time to transplant your cannabis into larger pots with more room for roots to spread down and out. After you’ve done this, you’ve successfully germinated your cannabis seeds into proper, young plants.

How to germinate seeds in water

You can also germinate your seeds by placing them in water. It’s slightly faster than the soil method, but you need to adjust your environmental factors accordingly. Remember, successfully germinating seeds requires a perfect balance of ideal growing conditions. When germinating in water, seeds need only 24-48 hours to pop their stems, though cultivators can keep them soaking for up to a week as needed. Water germination is faster because the seed gets all the moisture it needs immediately, and the shell softens and cracks more easily after soaking.

To employ water germination, fill a glass with tap water and let it sit until it reaches room temperature or around 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Add two to three plant seeds per cup and allow them to sit, watching for any changes. Change the water to fresh tap water every two days, making sure it stays at room temperature.

The seeds should start sprouting in about two days, though older seeds can take up to a week to sprout. You can remove them from the water and place them in the soil at any point once they’ve sprouted. Once the roots are about five millimeters long, they need to be planted.

The downside of water germination is that once they’ve popped, you’ll need to maneuver them into their growing medium manually. This is a delicate process, as germinating seeds are extra fragile, and any harm risks the development of your plants. Make sure to place the seed roots down in the soil when you transfer to a pot.

How to germinate seeds using paper towels

The paper towel method is also a common way cultivators pop their seeds. Some even use this method with cotton pads instead of paper towels, but the necessary steps are the same.

To germinate seeds this way, lay one paper towel on top of a countertop, place a few seeds, and cover them with a second paper towel.

Lay one paper towel on top of a countertop, place a few seeds, and cover them with a second paper towel. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Use a spray bottle to moisten the paper towels and then store the cushioned seeds between two plates, under a face-down bowl, or gently place them in a plastic bag. Maintain a temperature of about 72 degrees Fahrenheit, keeping the paper towel wrapped seeds in the dark and away from a windowsill. In two to five days, the seeds will pop inside the paper towel sandwich and emit tiny roots, ready to plant when they reach about five millimeters in length.

Use a spray bottle to moisten the paper towels and then store the cushioned seeds between two plates, under a face-down bowl, or gently place them in a plastic bag. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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The paper towel method also has its risk, as the fragile seedlings can be damaged during the potting process. The tiny roots can also get tangled in the paper towels, so make sure to move the seeds to potting soil before roots grow too long. Use your hands or tweezers to gently remove each seed from the paper towels and place them in a prepared growing medium.

How do you germinate seeds indoors?

Whether you’re planning an indoor cultivation or outdoor grow, it’s best to germinate your seeds indoors. It’s easier to maintain proper temperature, light exposure, and moisture inside, and you can protect your seeds from the elements. Indoor germination, whether using soil or paper towels, will ensure your cannabis seeds have the best chance for survival.

To germinate seeds indoors, use any of the methods described above. Within a few days, you’ll have popped seeds ready to transfer to a growing medium.

Do you need to germinate seeds before planting?

While many plants can be germinated in the ground, cannabis seeds are fragile enough that you should germinate them before planting.

Once your seeds have sprouted roots, they should be planted in soil, a soil-less medium, or in your hydroponic setup. Make sure not touch the root, caring for and navigating the seedling so that the roots face downward. Plant the seed about one inch deep in your growing medium, cover lightly, and allow for about a week for the seed to emerge from the soil. If the seed hasn’t poked through by day ten, it likely didn’t survive.

Will 93 degrees kill my germinating seeds?

I started seeds with temp at 80 degrees, came back 8 hours later and temp dipped to 73, so I turned the heat up. Came back 8 hours later and temp was 93. Damn walmart heater sucks, thermostat does not work properly. Do you think I killed my seeds?

This is my first germinating experience. I bought some Sannie seeds and am using rapid rooters, and one of Sannie’s grow plugs (forgot what they’re called). I soaked the seeds in RO water for 4 hours, also I soaked the rooters then sqeezed out the excess water, Made a little bigger hole in the rooters, about 1/2 inch down. Then I put the seeds in the hole and covered the hole with a little bit of the rooter material. Then I added a little bit of the Sannie’s solution in water to the plugs, I know I should have done this before putting the seeds in and squeezed out the excess. The plugs are definable on the moist side, but not really soaked. Left the room at 80 degrees and like I said when I came back after 16 hours it was 93 degrees. I’m prayer I did not kill them.

Kswisss
Well-Known Member
Kswisss
Well-Known Member

Temps irrelevant, stick the seeds in ur cabinet ina wet paper towel in a zip lock bag and check them every.day or two, wetting the paper towel if needed. All the other shit is unnecessary

Alienwidow
Well-Known Member
$bkbbudz$
Well-Known Member
240sxing
Well-Known Member

Depending on how long they actually were at 90 Degrees, you have may helped yourself in speeding up the process. I germinate at roughly 84 ^ , so you be patient and you might have create a boost per say.

whitebb2727
Well-Known Member

Temps irrelevant, stick the seeds in ur cabinet ina wet paper towel in a zip lock bag and check them every.day or two, wetting the paper towel if needed. All the other shit is unnecessary

No, that is unnecessary. You know o KY pot growers and fifth grade science student use paper towels to germ seeds.

The tap root has many hair like roots in it. Not visible to the named eye. The more steps and handling in the sprouting process increases the chance of damage. Bacteria that causes damping off loves the same conditions as a sprouting seed.

I know it works but why take the chance. It is a seed and will sprout just fine.

I’m not knocking you for doing it. Do what floats your boat.

tilopa
Well-Known Member
Greenhouse;save
Well-Known Member

Well let’s just think about this for a moment. a seed no matter how it’s germed loves lots of heat and humidity. I agree with 240 also the paper towel method come on guy’s it’s 2016,some soil(plug or wot ever)a wee bit of water,small amount of light and then let it do its own thing. KISS. Imo a jiffy plug is best for starting a seed in,right size,right content,easily handled. simple.

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420monster
Well-Known Member

There was a study done a few years go with germination with various temps the hypothesis was that temps lower then 70 and higher the 80 would not germination the Germ rates under 70 were expected but the rates of the temps higher then 80 were better then the rates of thoes within the 70-80 range there for the hypothesis was null and rejected

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DesertGrow89
Well-Known Member

When the cotyledon emerges from the soil, the root is already roughly four inches long, so you want a substrate that is capable of providing ample space for the rootzone (18oz solo cups are great, just put plenty of drainage holes in the bottom. One night I was extremely stoned and turned the central heating on to max, woke up and it was over 100 degrees, the seeds I had germining emerged two days later lol.

Also four hours is a bit short of a time to soak them in water, try twelve hours with 1 Tablespoon of bleach per gallon mixed into the water, soak em in that for half an hour then dump the solution, add regular tap water or RO back in, shouldnt matter. This longer soak should get them rooting faster.

What are you growing from Sannie? Just recently germinated some jackberry F4 form them and I’m waiting for Eskobars chocolate rain to come back in stock, seems they have been out for months.

turbobuzz
Well-Known Member

It’s probably fine, but they are correct, the paper towel thing is the best. I put mine in a Baggie, on a saucer, and cover it with another saucer, and keep it on top of the cable box for heat. Works every time.

Larry Gardener
Well-Known Member

Your seeds will be fine. Keep them moist and they will come up in just about anything. I do a little of everything, including a couple of days in a wet paper towel, peat moss pucks in a pan with a little water in the bottom and putting the seeds right into potting soil. They all work. I do like the pucks best though. Pretty cheap too.

You might get a higher % of males from the elevated germination temps. So says Subcool, anyway.

kiwipaulie
Well-Known Member

No, that is unnecessary. You know o KY pot growers and fifth grade science student use paper towels to germ seeds.

The tap root has many hair like roots in it. Not visible to the named eye. The more steps and handling in the sprouting process increases the chance of damage. Bacteria that causes damping off loves the same conditions as a sprouting seed.

I know it works but why take the chance. It is a seed and will sprout just fine.

I’m not knocking you for doing it. Do what floats your boat.

God I almost hit my head when I read his comment.

There is no fucken need for this zip lock, float seeds blah blah bullshit.

Greenhouse;save
Well-Known Member
Greenhouse;save
Well-Known Member

When the cotyledon emerges from the soil, the root is already roughly four inches long, so you want a substrate that is capable of providing ample space for the rootzone (18oz solo cups are great, just put plenty of drainage holes in the bottom. One night I was extremely stoned and turned the central heating on to max, woke up and it was over 100 degrees, the seeds I had germining emerged two days later lol.

Also four hours is a bit short of a time to soak them in water, try twelve hours with 1 Tablespoon of bleach per gallon mixed into the water, soak em in that for half an hour then dump the solution, add regular tap water or RO back in, shouldnt matter. This longer soak should get them rooting faster.

What are you growing from Sannie? Just recently germinated some jackberry F4 form them and I’m waiting for Eskobars chocolate rain to come back in stock, seems they have been out for months.

Hey desert I’ve just finished 8 of sannies j/b with a few of his herijuana and I’ve gotta say GREAT PLANTS lovely smoke and very nice on the eye as well.I’ve also done a few of his choc/cheese freebies and they totally blew me away. in fact they were that good I emailed him to see if hey would sell them in packs but due to an agreement he has with his breeders he could not do wot I asked. it’s not so much that its like the old school cheese(that I love)it’s not but wot it is is a VERY tasty bit of smoke I’m gutted I never kept a clone of it. have you tried his choc/rain I’m wondering if it’s anything like the choc/cheese.