Pistachio seeds

Pistachio Nut, Pistachio Pistacia vera – Pistacia narbonensis, Pistacia trifolia

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Stratification: Roll seed loosely in damp (not wet) burlap, cloth towels, or paper towels and place the towels in plastic bags. Keep refrigerated at 33–36 °F for 6 weeks.

Germination: Remove bags from refrigerator and place at room temperature, between 70–90 °F, check seeds for root growth at least every other day and remove seeds from towels as early as possible after observing root growth and plant in light soil media, potting soil, peat pots, or other standard soil mix.

Other: Keep in greenhouse until danger of frost is past. Transplant into larger containers as required. This a a method established by the UCDavis. (http://fps.ucdavis.ede).

* The pistachio ( Pistacia vera L., Anacardiaceae ) is a small tree native to some regions of Syria , Iran , Turkey , Greece , Turkmenistan , Pakistan , and Afghanistan , that produces an important culinary nut . Pistacia vera often is confused with other species in the genus Pistacia that are also known as pistachio. These species can be distinguished from P. vera by their geographic distributions (in the wild) and their nuts. Their nuts are much smaller, have a strong flavor of turpentine , and have a shell that is not hard.

* The pistachio ( Pistacia vera L., Anacardiaceae ) is a small tree native to some regions of Syria , Iran , Turkey , Greece , Turkmenistan , Pakistan , and Afghanistan , that produces an important culinary nut . Pistacia vera often is confused with other species in the genus Pistacia that are also known as pistachio. These species can be distinguished from P. vera by their geographic distributions (in the wild) and their nuts. Their nuts are much smaller, have a strong flavor of turpentine , and have a shell that is not hard. more.

* This species need winters that are cold enough for dormancy,(around 45℉ or below ) but not too cold. more.

Growing Pistachio Tree from seed

As it happens in many fruit trees (citrus, apple etc.) a pistachio tree grown from seed may not bear fruits for the whole of its lifetime for various reasons. Besides, in order to harvest pistachios, we have to plant at the same yard at least one male and one female pistachio tree, so that the pollen can travel through the wind from the male tree to the female tree. But since you want to feel the joy of growing your own tree from seed, let’s get started.

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The first thing we have to do is search for natural fresh harvested pistachios. This may be more difficult than it sounds, because nearly all newly harvested pistachios are transferred to the processing units in less than 20 hours. Keep in mind that most of pistachios we can find in the market are roasted, so these seeds will definitely not sprout. In all cases, we need to find seeds that have not been processed in any way. They must be untreated, unroasted, unheated, and unsalted seeds.

Once we find the natural seeds, we have to select at least 10 of them. All things done correctly, only 50% of the seeds or less will germinate, and only a fraction of those will make it to a small seedling and young tree. We break carefully the shell and we collect the seeds. Then, we place them upon a wet towel and we put the towel in a transparent plastic bag (see image). They key from now on is to place the bag at a room temperature, but next to a window with access to direct sunlight. We have to check once in a week if the towel is wet, and add a small volume of water if needed.

(When done professionally and at a large scale, the plastic bag with seeds is first stored in the fridge for 6 weeks, before returning at a room temperature. However, at small scale, someone can skip this step. Your germination rate will definitely be smaller than a pro (90%), but 3-4 seeds out of 10 will finally germinate, without waiting for 6 more weeks).

About 3-5 weeks later, some seeds will have normally sprouted. We plant them in individual small pots containing special soil mix (soil with river sand and compost etc.). We have to plant the seeds superficially, at a depth of 1,2 inches (3 cm) and cover lightly with soil. Then, we place the pots at a room temperature, close to a wide window, so that the seedlings will have again access to plenty of sunlight. The most important thing from now on is to keep the pots moist but not soggy. When the seedlings have reached a height of 6 inches (15 cm), we can transplant them at a bigger container.

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You can enrich this article by leaving a comment or photo of your pistachio tree growing from seed methods and experiences.

2.) How to grow Pistachio Tree from nut

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How to Start Pistachio Trees From Seed

The pistachio tree (Pistacia vera) rarely appears in home gardens despite the appeal of its edible nuts, attractive growth habit and steady growth rate, which can reach 24 inches per year, according to Cal Poly Urban Forest Ecosystems Institute. This heat-loving deciduous tree thrives in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 7 to 11, where it can reach a mature height of 25 to 30 feet with a 25- to 30-foot-wide canopy.

Pistachio trees are rarely propagated by seed because there is no way of knowing whether the resulting tree is a nut-producing female tree or a male tree that will only produce pollen. However, it is possible to grow pistachio trees from seed if the seeds are fresh and pretreated.

Starting Pistachio Seeds

The oblong, 1-inch-long seed of the pistachio needs to be soaked in room-temperature water for 24 to 48 hours before sowing, according to UC Davis Foundation Plant Services. After soaking, wrap the seeds in a moist cotton kitchen towel or paper towel and place them inside a plastic bag. Alternatively, White Buffalo Trading Company recommends placing the seeds in a plastic bag filled with moistened sand. Make sure the bag has a few air holes to let excess moisture escape. Store the container in the refrigerator at 33 to 36 degrees Fahrenheit for six weeks to chill the seeds.

After six weeks, remove the bag from the refrigerator and place it where temperatures stay between 70 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep the cloth or the sand slightly moist and check for signs of sprouting every day. Plant the pistachio seeds in nursery pots filled with a mixture of half perlite and half potting soil as soon as sprouts appear. Set the seeds just below the surface of the soil with the root pointing down and the leaf sprout pointing up. Water until a little bit of water dribbles from the drainage holes at the bottom of the pot.

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Growing Pistachio Tree Seedlings

Pistachio trees grow slowly but produce a deep, penetrating root system, according to California Rare Fruit Growers. It’s best to grow them in pots for just a year or two before transplanting them into the garden. Keep the trees under lightly shaded and sheltered conditions protected from excessive summer heat and winter chill. Choose a growing location with very bright light but some shade during the hottest part of the day. Water deeply but infrequently, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings.

Transplant pistachio seedlings into the ground in autumn of their second growing season. Pistachio trees take four to 10 years to express their sex, so it’s not possible to tell if a pistachio tree is female or male until it has grown for several years. Fortunately, trees of both sexes share the same ornamental traits of attractive silver-green foliage and a lush, vase-shaped growth habit, so sex is only relevant if you were hoping to grow pistachios at home for their nuts.

Planting Pistachio Trees

Pistachio trees grow best in full sun and deep, sandy soil with fast drainage and good moisture retention. They tolerate heat and drought with no trouble, although they will look best if provided with regular watering during hot weather. Female pistachio trees produce their characteristic nuts that can cause an abundance of dry litter if the nuts aren’t harvested, so it’s best to plant pistachio trees away from yards and walkways where the litter could cause an issue. Space pistachio trees according to their use, allowing 20 feet or more between individual trees and 15 feet between multiple trees to create a screen.

Pistachio trees grow very slowly and do not need heavy feeding to support their growth, although they may benefit from an application of balanced, 10-10-10 fertilizer in spring. Apply the fertilizer to wet soil and water well afterward to push the nutrients into the soil. Water pistachio trees weekly during their first summer in the ground. Withhold watering during rainy and cold weather because excess soil moisture can cause root problems in pistachio trees. A well-situated pistachio tree with good care can live up to 150 years.