Throwing Weed Seeds Outside

If I bury this pot seed will it grow? February 20, 2009 4:02 PM Subscribe So every now and then a few seeds show up in the shake. Are these real, growable marijuana seeds? If I planted one, and Growing cannabis outdoors needn't be a difficult task, but you should still prepare yourself! Here are our tips for achieving your best harvest yet in 2022. Growing cannabis is a lot like growing anything else. And as you would with most seed germinating, just follow the spring equinox…for the most part. The equinox falls in March, and while that might mean outdoor germination time in Arizona or California, Colorado is still liable to have snow through April and even May.

If I bury this pot seed will it grow?
February 20, 2009 4:02 PM Subscribe

So every now and then a few seeds show up in the shake. Are these real, growable marijuana seeds? If I planted one, and gave it all the TLC yer supposta, would it grow? Or do you need to get your hands on some sort of special seed stock if you hope to raise a plant?
posted by It ain’t over yet to Home & Garden (11 answers total)

Yes, you can likely grow them. There are plenty of fora discussing various techniques. Looks like a lot of work to me.
posted by jdfan at 4:10 PM on February 20, 2009

Yes, it should grow, but the breeding stock will vary depending on where it comes from. There is a correlation between the quality of the marijuana and the quality of the seeds. Keep in mind that if it was grown south of the border, it might not be well suited for your local climate. If you are looking for indoor use, some seeds will be much better for indoor use.

If you have a variety of marijuana, save a few seeds from each kind and you can find out which ones do best.
posted by diamondsky at 4:18 PM on February 20, 2009

I’ve raised a few from seeds. They definitely have not been as strong as what I can buy. But the ones I raised were literally thrown in the garden or rescued from the compost and ignored to grow wild like the weed they are.
posted by saucysault at 4:31 PM on February 20, 2009

I accidentally grew one once, from a seed that was discarded by throwing it in a pot with another plant.
posted by All.star at 4:39 PM on February 20, 2009

“It doesn’t take a miracle to cultivate a weed”
posted by piedmont at 4:40 PM on February 20, 2009 [1 favorite]

I’ve been tossing seeds in potted plants for years and they inevitably sprout into long leggy things that drop dead a week later. Even if they matured they would reflect the quality of the original weed — not so great if I’m picking out seeds in the first place.

Growing quality pot takes some work — myself, I’ve never had the patience or inclination to see a crop through. There is also an investment in lighting (pay attention here, large growers get popped all the time because their attics spit out a huge IR signature and/or their utility bills spike), ventilation (good weed stinks, like a skunk) and time. That said, if you want to grow for personal use I encourage it. It tends to remove the whole sleazy “drug dealer” part of the equation and puts you clearly in the victimless crime category.

The people I know who have grown high quality weed from seed have started with good seed stock. It’s my understanding that having seeds sent from overseas (seed banks) has a pretty good success rate. Obviously you will want to take commonsense precautions to maintain deniability just in case those pesky postal inspectors are paying attention and you probably don’t want to use your credit card.

If you want to grow for profit my advice would be to start working out now. It’ll make you look better when you start doing push-ups with your new friends in jail.
posted by cedar at 4:55 PM on February 20, 2009 [2 favorites]

They are, and it would. Cultivation methods (as well as genetic makeup) make a big difference in final quality. Also be aware that for your purposes only the female plants matter, so for each seed that reaches maturity, there’s only a 50% it will prove interesting.

And as Cedar points out, please recognize the significant legal implications of allowing said seeds to do what nature intended.
posted by fogovonslack at 8:16 PM on February 20, 2009

It’s cute to see them germinate (toss them in with a houseplant) but it takes a little extra love to get them to grow big.

Also, you might end up with male plants which won’t do much for you, recreation-wise.

If you do end up getting a healthy happy grown up female plant, she’s gonna be odourous smelly.
posted by porpoise at 8:35 PM on February 20, 2009

Best answer: They’ll grow, just pick the ones that aren’t cracked!! Put em on a wet paper towel and cover with saran wrap, then wait until they look like a little sperm, pop em in the soil, give LOTS of light for 24 hours for a month, switch to 12 hours of darkness, and enjoy 😉
posted by In Heaven at 9:58 PM on February 20, 2009

Best answer: Putting aside all other issues of legality, security and so forth (which you should definitely not do were you to hyconsider taking this question beyond the hypothetical) sure, there are viable seeds in most weed.

The quality of the plant is variable and impossible to determine in advance. Marijuana is sexually gendered (it has distinct male and female plants, although there are varieties that strongly exhibit hermaphroditism as well). Males produce the pollen and are useless in terms of producing high quality marijuana – so half the seeds you might theoretically plant are going to be pointless except for making more seeds. More importantly, the biggest factor in the quality of the plant’s product is its genetics.

The seed in your shake may be resulted from pollination by some random male, including an agricultural variety, because there are massive amounts of wild hemp from decades old agricultural production all over the place and there is plenty of hemp pollen floating around as a result. The genetics of the seed could therefor be pretty unfavorable for producing marijuana for smoking.

See also  Green Crack Weed Seeds

On the other hand, a seed might have set from stray pollen from the grower’s own propagation program, in which case it could be as good as the product it was found in. Grown carefully, it could be better, if the product was poorly grown/harvested/dried/transported.

It’s worth noting that many of the foundation varieties of the high-end cannabis breeding world were developed by people in California breeding out of stock from mostly indifferent Mexican commercial pot. The potential is always there: the principles of breeding for specific characteristics is like any other plant.

Serious commercial growers are managing their own propagation programs to generate a stable quality seed stock or getting seeds from the well-established and very lucrative market that exists, in some places openly or semi-openly (Holland, Canada – in Canada there was a thriving market that has been under attack by their authorities for a while now), for seeds of known varieties of exceptional quality. Some commercial seeds even exploit chemical manipulations to produce seeds with only female plants.

If you are really fascinated in the entirely hypothetical world of growing weed, consider checking out some books – Ed Rosenthal and Mel Frank are two classic authors.

Legally growing is quite a different issue than the sort of small scale possession most pot smokers deal in. Personally I’d never chance it these days but of course I’m a father now and a lot more conservative with respect to risk in general. I still wistfully hope someday (within my lifetime, please) it might become as accessible as home brewing, as it should be.
posted by nanojath at 10:37 PM on February 20, 2009

Best answer: Your seeds are likely from an outdoor grow since an indoor grower would never let pollen spread among the female plants. Your seeds can be grown indoor or outdoor but if you go the indoor route in can definately be worth to try to get your hand on a specific indoor strain since theese are breeded for yield and quality under controlled curcumstances opposed to the outdoor strain where you want them as though as possible.
posted by ilike at 2:58 AM on February 21, 2009

How To Grow Cannabis Outdoors in 2022

For cannabis growers, the outdoor season inspires joy and fulfilment. Tending to plants under the blazing sun is its own form of meditation. In this guide, we provide our top tips for growing cannabis outdoors in 2022. Read up, prepare yourself, and achieve the harvest of your dreams!

Cannabinoids, terpenes, phytochemicals, organic cultivation

A guide to growing cannabis outdoors in 2022.

Contents:

  1. Growing cannabis indoors vs outdoors: differences
  2. Growing cannabis outdoors
  3. Choosing location
  4. Genetics
  5. Germination
  6. Maintaining the plant
  7. A word on watering
  8. Preventing pests
  9. Protect against pollination
  10. Outdoor grower’s calendar 2022

Growing cannabis outdoors comes with many benefits. Apart from being a thoroughly enjoyable experience, it allows growers to rear bigger plants with better yields. Read on to learn how to grow cannabis outdoors.

Growing Cannabis Indoors vs Outdoors: Differences

Growing outdoors usually means more space to work with, plenty of sunshine, free rainwater, better ventilation, and the joy of cultivating in the elements.

However, growing outdoors also comes with a set of challenges. Plants are more vulnerable to pest insects, larger predators, heat waves, and cold snaps.

Growing indoors offers plants more shelter, and cultivators are in complete control of the growing environment. They are free to change temperature and humidity settings, and their plants are more concealed.

With that said, indoor growers usually have less space at their disposal, less potential for massive yields, and have to splash money on electricity bills to run their setup.

Growing Cannabis Outdoors

Sun. Fresh air. Soil. Growing cannabis outdoors offers a plethora of benefits for cultivators and cannabis plants alike. Everything from free resources to more time spent outside make it a worthwhile pursuit.

Benefits Of Growing Outdoors

– Larger plants
– More space
– Free rainwater
– Sunshine (cheaper than lighting)
– No need to change light cycle
– Ventilation helps keep mould at bay
– Companion plants
– Beneficial insects
– Soil rich in native microbes
– Opportunity to practice regenerative methods

Choosing Location

After deciding to grow outdoors, you’ll need to decide where to position your plants. Find an area that provides stable temperature, adequate sunlight, and shelter from harsh weather.

Make sure the area of your garden/position of your planting containers meets the following demands when growing in Europe in 2021:

• Temperatures never drop below 12°C
• Temperatures never exceed 30°C
6–8 hours of direct sunlight each day (south-facing location is ideal)
Shelter from torrential rain and heatwaves (e.g. temporary tarpaulin, greenhouse)

Growing Locations

As a robust herb, cannabis will happily grow in a variety of locations. Some cultivators have a spacious garden at their disposal, whereas others are limited to smaller spaces.

Balcony

The accessibility of balconies makes them a great place to grow weed. However, certain variables pose drawbacks that will significantly change the size of your harvest.

Pros Cons
Fresh air and natural light North-facing balconies receive almost no direct sunlight
South-facing balconies receive sunlight all day High-rise buildings expose plants to strong winds
Reduced water and electricity bills
Pros Cons
Fresh air and natural light North-facing balconies receive almost no direct sunlight
South-facing balconies receive sunlight all day High-rise buildings expose plants to strong winds
Reduced water and electricity bills
Rooftop / Terrace

Growing weed on a rooftop or terrace provides advantages that balconies lack. However, they do come with a few risks of their own.

Pros Cons
Rooftops receive sun all day long, considering they aren’t blocked by taller structures More exposed to the eye in the sky
Good exposure to rainwater Plants are more susceptible to storms and intense heat
More concealed to neighbours and the public than balconies
Pros Cons
Rooftops receive sun all day long, considering they aren’t blocked by taller structures More exposed to the eye in the sky
Good exposure to rainwater Plants are more susceptible to storms and intense heat
More concealed to neighbours and the public than balconies
Private Garden

Private gardens are one of the most pleasant places to grow cannabis. Cultivators often get lost in the tranquillity of tending to their crop in the summer months.

Pros Cons
Plenty of space Chance of pests
Opportunity to grow companion plants in a polyculture Risk of soil mould, such as Fusarium
Hidden from public view
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Pros Cons
Plenty of space Chance of pests
Opportunity to grow companion plants in a polyculture Risk of soil mould, such as Fusarium
Hidden from public view
Guerrilla Growing

Guerrilla growing enables cultivators to raise plants outside of their own property. By selecting a concealed location out in the countryside, weed lovers manage to fill up their stash jars with minimal risk along the way.

Pros Cons
Stealth Plants are exposed to bad weather and flooding
Low-risk Increased risk of pests and diseases
Cheap, with almost no overhead Hikers might stumble across your crop
Pros Cons
Stealth Plants are exposed to bad weather and flooding
Low-risk Increased risk of pests and diseases
Cheap, with almost no overhead Hikers might stumble across your crop
Greenhouse

Greenhouses offer the best of both worlds. They make use of natural sunlight while offering the warmth and shelter of an indoor environment.

Pros Cons
Opportunity to extend the outdoor growing season Plants may become stressed during heat waves
Protection against some species of pests Stale air and humidity can build up if an inadequate ventilation system is in place
Pros Cons
Opportunity to extend the outdoor growing season Plants may become stressed during heat waves
Protection against some species of pests Stale air and humidity can build up if an inadequate ventilation system is in place

Factors To Consider When Choosing a Growing Spot

Every growing location has its own advantages and disadvantages. While some cultivators are limited to a single spot, others can choose from several options.

Watering

Watering can become quite the chore. Outdoor plants will receive rainfall, but also face the reality of droughts. While watering an entire cannabis garden or greenhouse each day can become a challenge, setting up an irrigation system makes it almost effortless.

Plants in guerrilla growing spots naturally face more neglect than those grown closer to home. Try to choose a location close to a stream so you don’t have to carry heavy vessels of water to your secret location.

Garden Beds or Pots?

Pots allow growers to easily move their plants to safety when conditions get rough. Smart pots and air pots also help to minimise fungal infections and keep root systems aerated.

On the other hand, raised beds enable growers to cultivate multiple companion species within the same block of soil. Not only does this enrich the biodiversity of the soil, but it also creates a shield of protective plants that fend off pests while attracting beneficial insects.

RQS Geotextile Fabric Pot
Cannabis Light Pollution

Excessive light pollution from street lights may cause cannabis to remain in (or revert to) a vegetative state. Growers facing these conditions should consider autoflowering strains. These varieties grow rapidly and don’t require a specific light cycle to begin and sustain flowering.

Wind Damage

Those growing on balconies, rooftops, and in gardens should erect barriers and fences if they live in areas with strong winds. If you plan on mulching, go for heavier substrates pinned down with rocks, as opposed to straw and sawdust.

Hours of Light

Aim to grow plants in the sunniest spot you have access to. Cannabis requires a minimum of six hours of uninterrupted daily sunlight to perform well.

Safety

If you’re growing in an open garden, or your balcony is on the first or second floor, your plants will be exposed to other weed-lovers. Make sure to protect your plants from thieves and hungry animals alike.

Genetics

After selecting a location, you’ll need to choose a strain to grow. Here, you’ll need to consider your growing environment, and what kind of effect you’re looking for from your cannabis.

If you live further north and experience a shorter growing season, hardy and fast-flowering genetics such as autoflowers are a good choice. For those living further south, towering sativas that take longer to flower are a suitable option, and hybrids will thrive in these conditions.

Are you looking for a specific flavour? Research the terpene profiles of the strains you’re considering. This will give you a window into the sensory experience. Do you prefer fruity or earthy? Citrus or candy?

You can also use seed bank data to estimate the size, flowering time, and yield of a particular strain. If you can grow openly, consider a tall and highly productive strain. If you need to be more discreet, choose a smaller and more stealthy variety.

Germination

The first phase in your cannabis plant’s life is germination. During this process, your seed will form its first taproot and emerge into a seedling. Germination requires three specific factors: darkness, humidity, and moisture. Together, these elements will activate your seed. It just so happens that soil provides the perfect venue!

Growers in warm climates can start their plants directly in pots or garden beds outdoors. However, plants require high humidity during the seedling stage. Consider starting outdoor plants in a greenhouse or polytunnel.

Those in colder climates can get a head start by raising their seedlings indoors during the chilly spring. Transplant them directly into the soil or into larger outdoor containers when the weather warms up.

Before germinating your seeds, secure some high-quality soil. Organic soil provides everything your plants need to thrive: nutrients, beneficial bacteria, and synergistic fungi.

To germinate your seeds, poke a hole into the topsoil in a garden bed or pot. Place the seed in the hole and gently cover with soil. Add a little water. You’ll see the first shoot emerge within 2–7 days.

The seedling stage will last around two weeks. Provide consistent lighting, humidity levels of around 70%, and water sparingly.

Maintaining The Plant

The vegetative phase begins once the seedling stage comes to an end. During this time, your plants will focus on photosynthesising and creating energy to fuel development. Expect a flurry of large fan leaves to proliferate throughout this phase. To maintain your plants, you’ll need to consider the following:

Only water after the top 3–5cm of soil has become dry. If you don’t wait long enough, your plant can become vulnerable to root rot and other nasties.

Test your soil occasionally and make sure it stays within a pH range of 6.0–7.0—the optimal range for nutrient absorption.

A Word on Watering

Aim to water your plants every time the top inch of soil becomes completely dry; any more and you risk encouraging root rot. If you plan to take a vacation during the growing season, set up an automated system to ensure your plants stay hydrated.

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Preventing Pests

As one of the main challenges for outdoor growers, pests can be managed and prevented using the following tips:

Predatory insects: Introduce predatory insects such as ladybirds and parasitic wasps to protect your plants against pest species.

Companion planting: Plant basil, lemon balm, or dill to repel pest insects.

Beneficial fungi: Soil that contains mycorrhizal fungi can help capture and kill nematodes—soil microorganisms that attack cannabis roots.

Physical barriers: Erect chicken wire fences and other barriers to prevent larger animals such as deer and birds from munching on your crop.

Protect Against Pollination

You’ll need to defend your plants against pollination to produce the best bud possible. Pollinated flowers are smaller, loaded with seeds, and less potent. Although other pollinating species can greatly benefit your garden, growers need to actively prevent male plants from ending up in the growing space.

If you do happen to be growing regular cannabis seeds, you’ll need to be proactive about sexing your plants as they mature to prevent fertilisation.

Outdoor Grower’s Calendar 2022

This calendar revolves around the average climate in Europe. If you live in a more extreme climate (or in a different hemisphere), it’s worth looking into the relevant growing conditions.

Also, different strains will move much faster or slower than others. Keep the individual traits of your chosen cultivar in mind.

You’ll also notice that our calendar takes the time of year and the position of the moon and sun into consideration. Many gardeners work around the moon cycle due to the way the celestial body influences movements of moisture, sap, and subtle energies.

Indoor Germination

Start germinating your seeds indoors around February 27th if you live in a cooler climate. This date falls just before the full moon and encourages larger and more aromatic buds.

The spring equinox takes place on March 20th. During this time, the sun crosses the celestial equator, marking the first day of spring. Longer days and increased sunlight mean the growing season has begun! The seed will take anywhere between 2–7 days to complete germination and enter the seedling stage.

Seedling Stage / Growing Indoors

The seedling stage lasts around two weeks before the vegetative phase begins. Continue to raise plants indoors in colder regions until mid-April to meet temperature and light demands.

Sowing And Moving Outdoors

If you live in a warmer climate, now is the time to germinate seeds directly outside. You’ll also be able to move indoor plants outside and transplant them into soil or larger containers.

If you decide to orient your grow around the lunar cycle, aim to transplant while the descending moon enters its crescent phase.

After transplantation, plants will become established in the ground, continue vegetating, and put on some serious mass. The shift into summer will see them receive plenty of light. They’ll continue to stretch upward as the North Pole reaches its maximum tilt towards the sun.

Topping And Training

Once your plants settle in, growers have the option to top and train them. Doing so will increase their yields, open up their canopies, and make them easier to tame.

Measures such as low-stress training can be conducted throughout June and July into early August. After this, plants will begin edging toward the flowering phase, and additional training won’t be beneficial.

Aim to top and train your plants when the ascending moon is in its crescent phase, ideally in a water constellation.

Sexing

Before flowers appear, your plants will enter the pre-flowering phase. Use this time to sex your plants to ensure no unwanted males end up fertilising your ladies. Pre-flowers occur at the nodes—points at which each branch meets the main stem.

Female pre-flowers feature a small bulb and a protruding hair, or pistil. In contrast, male pre-flowers feature a hairless bulb. Remove any males if you’re not looking to create seeds.

Pruning

Your plants have entered the flowering phase. As the fall equinox approaches, the days begin to get shorter, and plants get the signal to blossom. Tidy them up and make sure each bud site has an adequate amount of light exposure.

Prune your crop between mid-July and the end of August in preparation for harvest time. Snip away excess fan leaves during a descending moon in the waning phase.

Harvest

Perhaps the most exciting time of the entire grow occurs between mid-September and mid-November. It’s time to revel in your hard work and harvest your precious flowers. The weather becomes cool, the days shorter, and winter solstice approaches.

Harvest your buds in the morning during a descending moon in the waning phase.

Ask a Stoner: When Should I Plant Seeds Outdoors?

Dear Kendal: Growing cannabis is a lot like growing anything else. Give it space, light, water, occasional protection from bad weather and maybe some nutrients, and it takes care of itself. And as you would with most seed germinating, just follow the spring equinox. for the most part. This year, the equinox falls on March 20, and while that might mean outdoor germination time in Arizona or California, Colorado is still liable to have snow through April and even May.

Freezing temperatures can kill seeds, so the best bet is to germinate them inside until the late snow passes.

Such cold temperatures can kill seeds, so the best bet is to germinate them inside until the late snow passes. If you’re only growing a few plants, this can be done in front of a sun-facing window. If you want to grow a lot, though, you’ll probably need to buy a growing light. Then transplant those baby weed plants outside before the summer solstice on June 20 (start watching weather forecasts after Mother’s Day). And go with a strain that has a short flowering time — because Colorado’s unpredictable snow usually returns in October.

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