Weed And Seed Walmart

Get tips for getting rid of crabgrass and how to prevent crabgrass from taking hold in your lawn. Retail giant Walmart has entered into a business deal with a Colorado-based cannabis company. But what does it mean? Saw this at the Coquitlam center Walmart in bc last night. Only the relaxed blend is on sale for $7. Awesome and tough are regular price at ~$18

How to Kill Crabgrass

Get tips for getting rid of crabgrass and preventing crabgrass from taking hold in your lawn.

Keep in mind: Price and stock could change after publish date, and we may make money from these affiliate links.

Crabgrass is a Lawn’s Worst Enemy

Crabgrass is a lawn’s worst enemy.

Photo by: Image courtesy of Macleay Grass Man.

Image courtesy of Macleay Grass Man.

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Is your lawn plagued by crabgrass? You’re not alone. This ugly weed is pervasive and common, and is probably taking over many yards on your block right this minute.

Crabgrass, a summer annual grassy weed, germinates in the spring from seed, lives its entire lifecycle in the summer, and then dies off. The annual cycle repeats when overwintering seeds feel spring’s warm arrival.

Identifying Crabgrass

Crabgrass is characterized by rough, pointy, light-green blades that grow in clumps that spread aggressively.

Crabgrass, in this case Digitaria ischaemum, sticks out like a sore thumb among green turf grasses.

Crabgrass, in this case Digitaria ischaemum, sticks out like a sore thumb among green turf grasses.

The three common crabgrass varieties are:

  • Smooth (Digitaria ischaemum )
  • Southern ( Digitaria ciliaris )
  • Large or hairy ( Digitaria sanguinalis )

All are pale green with five flat blades, and thrive in moist, fertile conditions in warm weather, especially in full sun.

Crabgrass Seeds

Overwintering as seeds, crabgrass seeds start germinating once air and soil temperatures (to a 2 to 4-inch depth) average 55 degrees, but additional seeds may germinate as late as June. Crabgrass propagates through generous seed production. A single plant will produce as many as 150,000 seeds, which spread easily by wind.

Because these invasive weeds sit very low to the ground, mower blades do not reach the plant but will agitate the seed heads, scattering seeds and accelerating propagation. Unmanaged, crabgrass can quickly overtake a lawn or appear along walkways or in pavement cracks during spring and summer months. Crabgrass will not survive the first frost, but the seeds remain to begin the cycle again when warm weather returns.

Preventing Crabgrass

Crabgrass Pre-Emergent

If crabgrass has been a problem in previous years, seeds lie in wait. The most popular and effective way to control crabgrass is to apply a pre-emergent herbicide. Pre-emergents prevent crabgrass seedlings from maturing, therefore solving a crabgrass problem before it begins.

Here are some tips on applying the crabgrass preventer:

  • Apply a few weeks before the last frost date in your area. Dr. Clint Waltz, a professor and turfgrass specialist at the University of Georgia, says that while it certainly warms up at different times across the country, spreading pre-emergent by March 15 is a pretty good rule. There’s little to no penalty for spreading the pre-emergent a little early.

Once crabgrass appears, pre-emergent herbicides may still be applied, but other strategies must also be employed to prevent the spread of seeds from developed plants.

Pre-emergent herbicides consist of pendimethalin, prodiamine or dithiopyr. Corn gluten is an organic pre-emergent option to synthetic herbicides, though Waltz says corn gluten isn’t as effective.

Note: A pre-emergent herbicide will, in addition to preventing crabgrass seed from germinating, also prevent your turfgrass from germinating. It’s best to wait six weeks after applying a pre-emergent before you sow grass seed.

Is Walmart Doing Business With The Cannabis Industry?

Although the federal government still considers marijuana an outlaw substance, more than half the states that make up this great nation have ripped the plant out of the trenches of prohibition for both medicinal and recreational purposes. This commitment to statewide drug reform has laid the groundwork for a golden industry of ganja — one that is expected to be worth in upwards of $24 billion within the next seven years.

Without a doubt, cannabis is on its way to becoming one of the leading cash crops in America. And there is green-eyed enthusiasm all around. So much that traditional industries ranging from Big Pharma to international breweries have all shown an interest in capitalizing on the monstrosity of legal marijuana. But the appeal of pot has not stopped there. It also seems that retail giant Walmart may be inching its way toward putting pot (or at least potting soil for pot) on its shelves in the not so-distant future.

It was announced earlier this week that Denver-based American Cannabis Company, which produces ancillary products designed specifically for the cannabis industry, has struck a distribution deal with a handful of national retailers, including Walmart, Home Depot and Amazon.

The distribution agreement will bring SoHum Living Soils and Dr. Marijane Root Probiotic to the mainstream marketplace. It is a move that is considered a hat tip from the boardrooms of big business, and the message is clear: No longer are multi-billion dollar corporations afraid to associate with companies connected to legal weed.

“ACC is excited to have the opportunity to offer our products online through these major retailers,” said CEO Terry Buffalo. “We are especially excited to be selling our proprietary SoHum Living Soils potting mix through these online channels, as we have spent years perfecting our blend, and fine-tuning the messaging around the brand itself.”

“We are also proud to be offering Dr. Marijane Root Probiotic on these online platforms,” he added. “This root probiotic is packed with all the beneficial microbes you need to awaken the nutrients in your soil or soil-less (hydroponic) medium.”

Some folks might scoff at the fact that ACC’s cannabis nutrients will only be available through online channels. But these days, the Internet is where commerce is happening. In fact, consumers are now buying more products from the Internet than ever before.

In 2017, the American consumer dropped nearly $454 billion with online retailers like Walmart and Amazon. That’s $63 million more than they spent in 2016. The latest numbers represent the highest increase in online sales since 2010, according to a report from the U.S Commerce Department.

It is worth mentioning that Amazon and Walmart are not just interested in getting a slice of the action from cannabis potting soil. These organizations have also struck deals with several other companies that manufacture health supplements made with hemp seed.

See also  Strongest Weed Seeds

Both retailers sell a variety of hemp oils and other hemp-based products that are marketed as remedies for chronic pain, insomnia and mood disorders. Although these products are not made from the cannabis plant, they are derived from its less interesting cousin.

But before Walmart and other national retailers could ever begin to consider slinging marijuana products in the same way they do with respect to alcohol, tobacco and pharmaceuticals, the federal government would first have change the nation’s pot laws.

Downgrading the plant’s Schedule I classification to a Schedule II could lead to retail chains making the herb available to customers with a prescription. A total repeal of pot prohibition, however, might set the stage for national retailers to distribute a variety of pot products similar to how they do now with beer, wine and hard liquor. Some of these events are already starting to take shape in Canada, which is set to fully legalize marijuana later this year.

But for now, the ancillary sector is probably as far U.S. retailers are willing to go.

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Scotts Turf Builder RELAXED Custom Seed Blend $7

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 29th, 2022 10:25 am
  • Category:

Jul 21st, 2021 11:32 am

[Walmart] Scotts Turf Builder RELAXED Custom Seed Blend $7

Saw this at the Coquitlam center Walmart in bc last night. Only the relaxed blend is on sale for $7. Awesome and tough are regular price at ~$18

Nearby Walmart locations:

Jul 21st, 2021 11:35 am

Jul 21st, 2021 11:41 am

Can someone shed some light if it is a good product?

“approximately 80% Fine Fescue, 15% Kentucky Bluegrass, and 5% Perennial Ryegrass”

Jul 21st, 2021 11:46 am

Jul 21st, 2021 11:47 am

Jul 21st, 2021 11:47 am

bullbell wrote: ↑ Can someone shed some light if it is a good product?

“approximately 80% Fine Fescue, 15% Kentucky Bluegrass, and 5% Perennial Ryegrass”

The fine fescue in my lawn from last fall’s overseeding is all dead this year because of the summer heat. The ryegrass and bluegrass are thriving. Will be avoiding fine fescue in the future. I’ve realized that my lawn is mostly sunny, not sun and shade.

Jul 21st, 2021 11:54 am

Not saying they are all unreliable, but a lot of people have no idea how to seed, or are very inconsistent with watering.
Seeds are seeds, if you do things correctly, they’ll germinate.

Jul 21st, 2021 12:37 pm

Madevilz wrote: ↑ Not saying they are all unreliable, but a lot of people have no idea how to seed, or are very inconsistent with watering.
Seeds are seeds, if you do things correctly, they’ll germinate.

I’ve always had problems with grass seeds in general even with water timers running at 5 a.m. Then I tried the newspaper and burlap method I saw a neighbour using.

Now I just buy the cheapest blend I can find and I never have any issues even in the middle of summer. My grass doesn’t need as much watering either.

Jul 21st, 2021 12:43 pm

Madevilz wrote: ↑ Not saying they are all unreliable, but a lot of people have no idea how to seed, or are very inconsistent with watering.
Seeds are seeds, if you do things correctly, they’ll germinate.

Jul 21st, 2021 12:55 pm

Jul 21st, 2021 1:00 pm

Jul 21st, 2021 1:05 pm

Bought 8 bags at my local store.. lots on the shelves.

My store had peat moss right nearby which is great because I have had a hard time finding it all year so far.

Time to dethatch, scarify, seed, top dress and water water water.

Jul 21st, 2021 1:22 pm

I guess Awesome and Tough are the better quality ones.
I have used Awesome so far, and would jump on it if it was $7!
Not sure how Relaxed is compared to it.
But if it works for someone who has used it before, then its a great deal!

Upvote for OP on the find though.

Jul 21st, 2021 2:41 pm

1) Depending on how serious you are, get a soil test. It can tell you a lot about what things are imbalanced in your soil and fixing these will make growing grass much easier

2) Wait until fall to reseed. People waste a ton of money on reseeding in the spring and wonder why it didn’t work. Well here we plant cool-season grasses and these do much better with a longer run-way to grow roots in the fall. Planting in the spring means the seed doesn’t have much time to grow robust root systems before getting wiped out by summer heat. Early – mid September is a good time to reseed here in SW Ontario, but adjust according to your geography/weather.

3) That means now is a good time to do your best to kill your current weeds and prep your lawn for a reseed. Most of the weed killer here in Canada is garbage and won’t do much. There are ways to get your hands on good stuff from the US (e.g. Seed ranch delivers to Canada) but there are obvious ethical, environmental, and personal health implications to these products that I’m not going to get into. Weed B Gone might be your best option for legal stuff here in Canada.

4) The other thing you can get done in the late summer/early fall before your reseed is dethatching. This is the process of pulling all the dead shit out of your grass that can’t prevent water and nutrients from getting to your soil/seed. There are electric or gas powered dethatchers. If you have a big lawn, well worth it to buy, rent one, or hire someone to do this for you. If you have a small lawn, you can buy a thatch rake. It’s important you get a thatch rake as a normal rake won’t do **** all. Just be warned that this is physically difficult and will give you some callused hands by the end.

5) The other thing you can consider is aerating. Contrary to popular belief, it’s not good to do this every year. Do the screwdriver test – if you can easily sink a flat-head into your soil, you don’t need to aerate. If this is difficult to do, try again after a light water. If it’s still difficult to do, then aerating will be beneficial

See also  Germinating Weed Seeds In Ziplock

6) As you can tell, the prep is almost as much if not more work than the seeding. Next step, mow your lawn low. This is one of the only times you SHOULD mow low. Cutting your grass down low is going to give your seeds more time to receive sunlight and water. You’ll also want to bag your clippings here. This step should be done before aerating obviously

7) Next you’ll likely want to put down a SMALL layer of top dressing – this is organic matter that is going to provide nutrients to your soil. More is not better.

8) I then put down some starter fertilizer. Usually this type of fertilizer has a high in phosphorus content which is going to encourage good root growth vs. high nitrogen content which you might use in the spring. Go to your local nursery. I find their products are way better and sometimes even cheaper than the hardware store crap (e.g. Scotts). Again, more is not better. Read the bag and do that math to know how much to lay down for your lawn area.

9) Seed – Do your research on what type of seed to buy and I’d encourage you to go to your local nursery to purchase. I bought some high end Rhizomatous Tall Fescue from my local nursery and it is awesome. It doesn’t spread laterally as much as other grass seeds so it may be more patchy your first season you seed, but it grows deep as hell meaning that it’s hardy, doesn’t get overrun by weeds as much, and can tolerate drought better than other grass. You’re going to want to buy a good broadcast spreader to lay your seed down. Hand held ones are not really good especially for large areas. Getting a good push one will make your life easier and ensure good/even spread. Once you’ve done the math on how much seed to spread based on your area, evenly spread the seed on top of the top dressing you put down.

10) After your seed is on your top dressing, gently rake it into the soil. It’s totally ok if some seeds are on top still. In fact, some people even suggest not raking and leaving on top. The issue is that it may make for some very expensive bird seed. What I did last fall and had good success with was putting down 75% of my seed, raking it in, and then recasting the last 25% on top.

11) Ok, now you have top dressing, fert, and seed down. Next step: Watering
This step is where most people **** up and blame the failure on the seed. A successful overseed or reseed requires very frequent, light watering. If you have an irrigation system this will be a piece of cake. If you have a manual sprinkler, it can be a daunting task. New seed requires light watering 3-4 times a day for about 1-2 weeks, then you can scale back and start to water for longer and less frequent. It will seem absurd how much you’re watering, but all of your hardwork and money is going to go down the drain (no pun intended) if you let the seedlings dry up in their infancy.

Again, there is too much of a good thing. You don’t want puddles forming.

12) Monitor your growth. If you seed early enough in the fall you may even have a little more time to hit areas that didn’t get much growth with seed and fill in any patches. Once your new grass has grown to 2-3 inches then hit it with the lawn mower with sharp blades. Keep mowing 1-2/times a week for the remainder of the fall.

13) Last thing I will say is that you should judge your success by next spring. It will still likely look patchy and thin in the fall although it will look a hell of a lot better than when you started. Once the spring hits, the new growth will come in much thicker and more lush if you did things properly. Then you can do all of your spring lawn care to ensure you have a kick ass summer lawn.

Hope that helps lol

Jul 21st, 2021 2:48 pm

Jul 21st, 2021 2:55 pm

xjesterxx wrote: ↑ Bought 8 bags at my local store.. lots on the shelves.

My store had peat moss right nearby which is great because I have had a hard time finding it all year so far.

Time to dethatch, scarify, seed, top dress and water water water.

A little too early for that. We’re pretty much in the middle of the high heat season. Doing all that right now might severely overstress the lawn. I would wait until it’s closer to middle to late August.

Jul 21st, 2021 3:30 pm

Chrno wrote: ↑ A little too early for that. We’re pretty much in the middle of the high heat season. Doing all that right now might severely overstress the lawn. I would wait until it’s closer to middle to late August.

You’re probably right.. Next week looks warm with rain in my area almost every day though and I have a good irrigation system / small area of lawn to recover. I’ve also got a mobile sprinkler on a timer that I can use to supplement the regular watering schedule if need be. I did manage to successfully re-grow half of my backyard after tilling the area (after scuffing it up here and there to install an irrigation system in my backyard).

Honestly my front grass is in dire shape and only about 200 sq ft .. I attribute it to my neighbors grass (connected) which is 100% weeds causing pressure, inconsistent watering from the previous sprinklers in my irrigation system (changed to rotors which I like better). Also I’ve never de-thatched it and have always used the mulch setting on my lawnmower. It’s still probably the best lawn on my street, but I don’t like it and if I can’t recover it I might till it and lay sod next year after I build some kind of barrier between my lawn & my neighbors.

Jul 21st, 2021 6:05 pm

Leafsfan34 wrote: ↑ 1) Depending on how serious you are, get a soil test. It can tell you a lot about what things are imbalanced in your soil and fixing these will make growing grass much easier

See also  Weed Seeds For Tortoises

2) Wait until fall to reseed. People waste a ton of money on reseeding in the spring and wonder why it didn’t work. Well here we plant cool-season grasses and these do much better with a longer run-way to grow roots in the fall. Planting in the spring means the seed doesn’t have much time to grow robust root systems before getting wiped out by summer heat. Early – mid September is a good time to reseed here in SW Ontario, but adjust according to your geography/weather.

3) That means now is a good time to do your best to kill your current weeds and prep your lawn for a reseed. Most of the weed killer here in Canada is garbage and won’t do much. There are ways to get your hands on good stuff from the US (e.g. Seed ranch delivers to Canada) but there are obvious ethical, environmental, and personal health implications to these products that I’m not going to get into. Weed B Gone might be your best option for legal stuff here in Canada.

4) The other thing you can get done in the late summer/early fall before your reseed is dethatching. This is the process of pulling all the dead shit out of your grass that can’t prevent water and nutrients from getting to your soil/seed. There are electric or gas powered dethatchers. If you have a big lawn, well worth it to buy, rent one, or hire someone to do this for you. If you have a small lawn, you can buy a thatch rake. It’s important you get a thatch rake as a normal rake won’t do **** all. Just be warned that this is physically difficult and will give you some callused hands by the end.

5) The other thing you can consider is aerating. Contrary to popular belief, it’s not good to do this every year. Do the screwdriver test – if you can easily sink a flat-head into your soil, you don’t need to aerate. If this is difficult to do, try again after a light water. If it’s still difficult to do, then aerating will be beneficial

6) As you can tell, the prep is almost as much if not more work than the seeding. Next step, mow your lawn low. This is one of the only times you SHOULD mow low. Cutting your grass down low is going to give your seeds more time to receive sunlight and water. You’ll also want to bag your clippings here. This step should be done before aerating obviously

7) Next you’ll likely want to put down a SMALL layer of top dressing – this is organic matter that is going to provide nutrients to your soil. More is not better.

8) I then put down some starter fertilizer. Usually this type of fertilizer has a high in phosphorus content which is going to encourage good root growth vs. high nitrogen content which you might use in the spring. Go to your local nursery. I find their products are way better and sometimes even cheaper than the hardware store crap (e.g. Scotts). Again, more is not better. Read the bag and do that math to know how much to lay down for your lawn area.

9) Seed – Do your research on what type of seed to buy and I’d encourage you to go to your local nursery to purchase. I bought some high end Rhizomatous Tall Fescue from my local nursery and it is awesome. It doesn’t spread laterally as much as other grass seeds so it may be more patchy your first season you seed, but it grows deep as hell meaning that it’s hardy, doesn’t get overrun by weeds as much, and can tolerate drought better than other grass. You’re going to want to buy a good broadcast spreader to lay your seed down. Hand held ones are not really good especially for large areas. Getting a good push one will make your life easier and ensure good/even spread. Once you’ve done the math on how much seed to spread based on your area, evenly spread the seed on top of the top dressing you put down.

10) After your seed is on your top dressing, gently rake it into the soil. It’s totally ok if some seeds are on top still. In fact, some people even suggest not raking and leaving on top. The issue is that it may make for some very expensive bird seed. What I did last fall and had good success with was putting down 75% of my seed, raking it in, and then recasting the last 25% on top.

11) Ok, now you have top dressing, fert, and seed down. Next step: Watering
This step is where most people **** up and blame the failure on the seed. A successful overseed or reseed requires very frequent, light watering. If you have an irrigation system this will be a piece of cake. If you have a manual sprinkler, it can be a daunting task. New seed requires light watering 3-4 times a day for about 1-2 weeks, then you can scale back and start to water for longer and less frequent. It will seem absurd how much you’re watering, but all of your hardwork and money is going to go down the drain (no pun intended) if you let the seedlings dry up in their infancy.

Again, there is too much of a good thing. You don’t want puddles forming.

12) Monitor your growth. If you seed early enough in the fall you may even have a little more time to hit areas that didn’t get much growth with seed and fill in any patches. Once your new grass has grown to 2-3 inches then hit it with the lawn mower with sharp blades. Keep mowing 1-2/times a week for the remainder of the fall.

13) Last thing I will say is that you should judge your success by next spring. It will still likely look patchy and thin in the fall although it will look a hell of a lot better than when you started. Once the spring hits, the new growth will come in much thicker and more lush if you did things properly. Then you can do all of your spring lawn care to ensure you have a kick ass summer lawn.