Weeds With White Seeds

Q. Crazy weeds are literally popping seeds at me and my dog as we walk through the grass in our neighborhood. I have never seen them before, but they are everywhere this season! They’re about four inches high, have white flowers and ‘popping seeds’ (no wonder they’re so successful at reproducing!). Any idea what they are? They are difficult to pull because the seeds pop into your face. Thanks. —N. Ivy; Gaithersburg, MDAbout three years ago I noticed a pretty little white flower growing in my lawn. But after a few weeks, it turned into something from a science fiction movie, shooting its spikey seeds every which way if you touched it. My local garden shop identified it as a type of chickweed, and suggested I pull as much out as I could by hand. I spent many hours doing so, and all I got was a sore back. Last year I went online and correctly identified the culprit as Hairy Bitter cress. The recommended control method was to use a spray called Spectracide, which they forgot to mention also kills the lawn. Is there anything you can suggest to rid my lawn of this nuisance? Thank you. —Larry in Audubon, PAA. As you can imagine, a weed that evolves to have its dried seeds sitting on a kind of ‘trigger’ that shoots them into the air when the plant is disturbed has a huge reproductive edge. If a big herbivore comes along to devour the plant, that first touch is going to release a lot of lifeboats carrying the next generation. A number of weeds have developed this explosive ability, with ‘hairy bitter cress’ the most likely culprit at this time of year.Its small white flowers are similar to those of chickweed, another ‘unwanted plant’ that blooms early in the Spring. But chickweed is more of a flat, spreading, mat-like plant. And its seedpods aren’t faster than a speeding bullet. Both weeds are remarkably easy to control in flowerbeds; just pull them, roots and all, out of wet soil. Chickweed comes out in big clumps, while bitter cress has a nice little stalk that gives you a handle to grab onto. Just remember to soak the soil first; all weeds come out of wet soil MUCH easier than dry. But I like to wait until after the little white flowers form to pull these weeds. Their flowers open up right before the blooms on my fruit trees, attracting lots of the pollinators and beneficial insects I’ll need to get a good fruit set and to fight all the pests that want to eat those peaches as much as we do. If I’m paying attention and life cooperates, I’ll pull the weeds while they’re still in flower and before they set seed. Both weeds get composted—mixed into a good amount of shredded leaves hoarded from the previous fall; at least two parts leaves to every part green weed. The bitter cress typically comes up with a good amount of soil attached to its roots, which adds microbial life to the pile; and the chickweed has a lot of water content to help keep the moistness levels right. If I don’t get to them in time, I toast the seedheads with my trusty flame weeder before I pull the plants, just like I do with dandelions that have progressed to the puffball stage. Dandelion seeds burst into little flares of color—like Munchkin fireworks. Bittercress seeds explode with a loud ‘pop’. (Organic gardening is SO much more fun than spraying hormonal disruptor around!) Both weeds are also highly edible, especially when young. Chickweed is more nutritious than the salad greens that many people remove it to plant! And, although hairy bittercress (a member of the mustard family) doesn’t have nearly as many wild food fans as chickweed or purslane (perhaps the most edible ‘weed’), it does have some of the peppery taste of its namesake watercress, and it’s loaded with cancer-fighting nutrients. Pick it before the flower buds form and it won’t have nearly as much of the bitter edge that older plants take on. (Flowering changes the flavor of virtually all herbs and greens for the worse.) In turf, weeds like bittercress are a sure sign of poor lawn care. The answer is not to poison yourself and the environment (and kill your grass) in a futile attempt to remove the weed, but to care for your lawn correctly and deny the weed a place to live. Take good care of your grass and a harmless little plant like this should never have a chance to get established, much less thrive. For a Northern, cool-season lawn (one composed of cool-season grasses like rye, fescue and/or bluegrass) that means never cutting shorter than three inches, never feeding in summer, watering deeply but infrequently, and giving the lawn a big natural feeding in the Fall. If you scalp the lawn, weeds will thrive. If you water it frequently for short periods of time, weeds will thrive. And if you feed the poor heat-stressed thing in summer, weeds will take over. Oh—and don’t use chemical herbicides. We hear they’re murder on the poor grass…. Ask Mike A Question    Mike’s YBYG Archives    Find YBYG Show Weeds have flowers too - but don’t be fooled! If you have lawn weeds with white flowers, it often spells trouble. I’ll help you identify 10 of the most common. Use these photos and descriptions to identify weeds in your lawn and garden.

Weeds That Shoot Their Seeds

Its small white flowers are similar to those of chickweed, another ‘unwanted plant’ that blooms early in the Spring. But chickweed is more of a flat, spreading, mat-like plant. And its seedpods aren’t faster than a speeding bullet. Both weeds are remarkably easy to control in flowerbeds; just pull them, roots and all, out of wet soil. Chickweed comes out in big clumps, while bitter cress has a nice little stalk that gives you a handle to grab onto. Just remember to soak the soil first; all weeds come out of wet soil MUCH easier than dry.

But I like to wait until after the little white flowers form to pull these weeds. Their flowers open up right before the blooms on my fruit trees, attracting lots of the pollinators and beneficial insects I’ll need to get a good fruit set and to fight all the pests that want to eat those peaches as much as we do.

If I’m paying attention and life cooperates, I’ll pull the weeds while they’re still in flower and before they set seed. Both weeds get composted—mixed into a good amount of shredded leaves hoarded from the previous fall; at least two parts leaves to every part green weed. The bitter cress typically comes up with a good amount of soil attached to its roots, which adds microbial life to the pile; and the chickweed has a lot of water content to help keep the moistness levels right.

If I don’t get to them in time, I toast the seedheads with my trusty flame weeder before I pull the plants, just like I do with dandelions that have progressed to the puffball stage. Dandelion seeds burst into little flares of color—like Munchkin fireworks. Bittercress seeds explode with a loud ‘pop’. (Organic gardening is SO much more fun than spraying hormonal disruptor around!)

Both weeds are also highly edible, especially when young. Chickweed is more nutritious than the salad greens that many people remove it to plant! And, although hairy bittercress (a member of the mustard family) doesn’t have nearly as many wild food fans as chickweed or purslane (perhaps the most edible ‘weed’), it does have some of the peppery taste of its namesake watercress, and it’s loaded with cancer-fighting nutrients. Pick it before the flower buds form and it won’t have nearly as much of the bitter edge that older plants take on. (Flowering changes the flavor of virtually all herbs and greens for the worse.)

In turf, weeds like bittercress are a sure sign of poor lawn care. The answer is not to poison yourself and the environment (and kill your grass) in a futile attempt to remove the weed, but to care for your lawn correctly and deny the weed a place to live. Take good care of your grass and a harmless little plant like this should never have a chance to get established, much less thrive.

For a Northern, cool-season lawn (one composed of cool-season grasses like rye, fescue and/or bluegrass) that means never cutting shorter than three inches, never feeding in summer, watering deeply but infrequently, and giving the lawn a big natural feeding in the Fall.

If you scalp the lawn, weeds will thrive. If you water it frequently for short periods of time, weeds will thrive. And if you feed the poor heat-stressed thing in summer, weeds will take over.

Oh—and don’t use chemical herbicides. We hear they’re murder on the poor grass….

Lawn Weeds with White Flowers (10 Types)

Toward the end of spring and the start of summer, I love to look out my window and see white flowers popping up throughout my yard as my flower beds bloom.

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But when white flowers are dotting my lawn, I know it could mean trouble. I have seen at least 10 types of lawn weeds with white flowers and they have all been unwanted at one time or another. I’m going to help you spot them in this post so you can deal with them before they become a problem.

Most Common Lawn Weeds with White Flowers (Short Answer)

The most common lawn weeds with little white flowers are white clover, chickweed, Queen Ann’s Lace, daisy, fleabanes, and hairy bittercress. Some tall weeds with small white flowers are yarrow, mayweed, pearlwort, and stinging nettle.

A Closer Look at Lawn Weeds with White Flowers

When you see little white flowers in the grass in spring, it could mean a range of things for your lawn. Some of these weeds can be helpful such as white clover. Others can be toxic to humans and pets like mayweed. Knowing what each plant does, looks like, and most importantly how to get rid of the bad ones will aid you in attaining lawn zen.

White Clover (Trifolium repens)

What It Does: While allowing clover to colonize 5% of your lawn can be beneficial for nitrogen-fixing, clover is a fast-growing aggressive weed that can take over large portions of a lawn. It develops a deep root system that makes it hard to remove completely.

What It Looks Like: This lawn weed is most recognizable by its little white flowers and three round leaves. The leaves have a white V near the tips and they can grow up to 7in tall.

How to Get Rid of It: Due to its extensive root system, white clover is a tough lawn weed to remove. The most effective way to get rid of these white flower weeds in the grass is to pull them by hand. If the area is small and you can pull up the entire root then you can stop the problem. If the area is larger you can mow higher to choke it out or mulch over it.

Chickweed (Stellaria media)

What It Does: This lawn weed with white flowers is most commonly found in overwatered lawns. It grows rapidly in a matting pattern that can choke out turf. Chickweed is a cold-loving annual and also a common carrier of plant pests and viruses that could do even more damage to your lawn.

What It Looks Like: Chickweed is covered in small white flowers that bloom in spring. The leaves are hairy along the bottom of the plant and become hairless at the top. The white flowers grow as a single flower or in clusters at the end of the stems.

How to Get Rid of It: The roots of this lawn weed with little white flowers grow very shallowly. If you are dealing with a small patch of lawn you can remove them by hand pulling. If you are dealing with a larger area you can apply a broadleaf herbicide.

Queen Ann’s Lace (Daucus carota)

What It Does: Also known as wild carrot, this weed produces huge clusters of little white flowers. Each of these flowers can spread as many as 40,000 seeds making it difficult to contain. The only danger this weed poses is that it looks almost identical to Poison Hemlock, a white flower-producing weed that is highly toxic to humans and pets.

What It Looks Like: Queen Ann’s Lace is a close relative to the garden carrot. It has green hairy stems (Poison Hemlock stems are purple, blotchy, and hairless) with a flat, white, and lacy flower. It can grow up to 4ft tall.

How to Get Rid of It: This tall weed with small white flowers only blooms in its second year of growth. If you dig them out before blooming, you can remove this weed without the risk of spreading its numerous seeds. A strong herbicide can be used if the flowers have already produced seeds.

Daisy (Bellis perennis)

What It Does: In moist soil and full sun, daisies can quickly spread and overtake a lawn. Daisy weeds can propagate via rhizome and they also produce seeds making them hard to control. The low-growing leaves form a mat that can choke out surrounding turf.

What It Looks Like: This is one of the most common little white flowers in the grass in spring. I have even seen daisies pop up during a mild winter. The flowers have white petals and a noticeable yellow center.

How to Get Rid of It: Unlike other lawn weeds with white flowers on this list, daisies have very weak roots and can easily be pulled up using a daisy grubber. A post-emergent herbicide can help control future outbreaks.

Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L.)

What It Does: These lawn weeds grow in neglected and compacted soil along the edge of a property. They spread quickly by nettle (burred seed) and produce underground stems. Brushing these weeds with your skin can result in burning and stinging pain.

What It Looks Like: Nettles are easy to recognize by their long bristly stems and stinging hairs on their leaves. The upper leaves of this weed produce white drooping flowers.

How to Get Rid of It: The best way to get rid of nettles is to continuously cut them back until they die off. Once they have died, you can pull the entire root and rhizome out to prevent them from spreading. For chemical control, you should apply a non-selective herbicide which is most effective between spring and fall.

Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta)

What It Does: This lawn weed with small white flowers is a relative of the mustard family. It gets an early start in the year and spreads rapidly. By late spring, the flowers have developed, and by summer, it forms long seed pods. When they burst, they send hundreds of seeds in every direction. They have long taproots and re-emerge if not completely removed.

What It Looks Like: Hairy bittercress is a ground weed that grows low and spreads quickly. It has round leaves in sets of three. By May, small white flowers can be seen growing between the leaves and the tap root will be thicker.

How to Get Rid of It: Due to its long tap root and heavy seed production, eradicating this weed is difficult. The only way I know how to get rid of white flower weeds in the grass when you can’t pull them is to use a post-emergent herbicide. This should prevent it from coming back next spring.

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

What It Does: This lawn weed commonly occurs in yards stressed by drought that are under-fertilized. If this condition occurs and yarrow is present, it will take off and choke out your turf. Yarrow is a mat-forming weed and spreads by rhizome stems that root at intervals.

What It Looks Like: This lawn weed with little white flowers can best be identified by its fern-like leaves. It can grow up to 3ft high and flowers from late May to summer. Yarrow produces green/grey leaves and thick roots.

How to Get Rid of It: Yarrow is hard to control and is resistant to selective herbicides. The best way to control this weed is by watering and fertilizing your lawn. Using repeated applications of non-selective herbicides can weaken this weed. In the spring, top dress early to choke out any remaining yarrow.

Mayweed (Anthemis cotula)

What It Does: This is a common lawn weed that grows in open spaces and flowers annually. It grows quickly and spreads rapidly by seed. Mayweed can cause skin irritation if touched and is toxic to animals. It is important to remove this weed right away.

What It Looks Like: While the flower of the mayweed resembles a daisy, that’s where the similarities end. The leaves are different, more fern-like, and resemble a fennel or chamomile plant. They grow to about 2ft and produce an unpleasant odor.

How to Get Rid of It: Tiny areas of this lawn weed with small white flowers can be hand-pulled. Make sure you either wear gloves or use a daisy grubber as the leaves cause skin irritations. For larger areas, you can use an herbicide, but make sure to get rid of the waste so it is inaccessible to animals.

Pearlwort (Sagina procumbens)

What It Does: Cutting a lawn too short can make it susceptible to a pearlwort infestation. These lawn weeds with little white flowers grow close to the ground in a matting pattern. They produce hundreds of seeds that get spread when mowed or walked on. This weed can quickly overtake a lawn.

What It Looks Like: Pearlwort is a creeping plant that can be mistaken for moss. It prefers cool moist areas and populates to make seeds quickly. The leaves of this weed are narrow and it only grows to around 4in tall. It has fine roots and it produces several branches. These branches support the white flowers.

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How to Get Rid of It: The best way to deal with this lawn weed is by having a thick turf. Regular watering and fertilization will prevent pearlwort from taking over. If it is already out of control, you can apply a herbicide that is absorbed through the plant’s leaves. This will weaken it and allow your turf to take hold again.

Fleabanes (Erigeron sp.)

What It Does: These weeds establish deep taproots and spread by seed. They grow quickly in open sunny places and can outcompete turf in poor-quality soil.

What It Looks Like: Fleabanes look like miniature daisies. They grow multiple stems and each stem has a tiny white flower with a yellow center. They also grow tiny hairs along the stalks. The flowers open in summer and can also bloom a second time in fall.

How to Get Rid of It: If you control this weed early in the spring, you can hand pull it. However, if you allow the fibrous roots to turn into a hard taproot, it becomes much more difficult to remove. In this case, you will have to apply a non-selective herbicide. These lawn weeds with little white flowers aren’t as invasive as the other lawn weeds, so they can be left alone if they are not in an unsightly area.

About Tom Greene

I’ve always had a keen interest in lawn care as long as I can remember. Friends used to call me the “lawn mower guru” (hence the site name), but I’m anything but. I just enjoy cutting my lawn and spending time outdoors. I also love the well-deserved doughnuts and coffee afterward!

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The Only Weed Identification Guide You’ll Ever Need: 33 Common Weedy Plants to Watch For

Andrea Beck spent more than three years writing about food for Better Homes & Gardens before serving as the assistant digital garden editor. Now, she writes about lifestyle topics, including food, garden, home, and health for Hy-Vee’s Seasons magazine. Her work has appeared on Food & Wine, Martha Stewart, MyRecipes, and more. Andrea holds a double degree in magazines and English, with a minor in politics from Drake University.

Don’t let these pesky plants crash your garden party! The first step is to know your enemy. Then you’ll know the best way to deal with your weed problem.

What Is a Weed, Anyway?

A weed can be any plant growing where you don’t want it to. However, there are some particularly weedy species to keep an eye out for. These aggressive plants not only make your yard look messy, they can also choke out the garden plants you’ve worked so hard to grow. Whether you’re trying to identify lawn weeds or garden weeds, this handy guide will help you identify more than 30 common weeds by photo, plus give you tips for how to best remove them.

Dandelion

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: 12 inches tall, 6-16 inches wide

Where It Grows: Lawns and gardens in sun or shade

Appearance: This common lawn weed has a long taproot with deeply notched leaves. Yellow flowers mature into puffballs. Dandelion seeds are like parachutes that fly away in the wind, helping them invade new spaces in lawns and garden beds.

Weed Control Tips: Mulch to prevent dandelions in gardens. Pull dandelion weeds by hand or treat lawns with a broadleaf herbicide, which won’t kill grass.

Oxalis

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: Up to 20 inches tall

Where It Grows: Sunny or shady landscape, lawn or garden areas

Appearance: This garden weed has light green leaves that look somewhat like clovers and cup-shape yellow flowers in summer and fall.

Weed Control Tips: Mulch garden areas in spring to prevent weeds. Pull oxalis weeds by hand or spray weeds with a broadleaf herbicide in spring or fall.

Crabgrass

Type: Grassy annual

Size: Up to 18 inches tall and 20 inches wide

Where It Grows: Lawn, landscape, and garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: Crabgrass is exactly what it sounds like: A grassy weed. This lawn weed grows roots anywhere the stem makes soil contact. Seed heads spread out like four fingers.

Control: Use a pre-emergence weed preventer to prevent seeds from sprouting, pull crabgrass by hand, or spot-treat with a nonselective herbicide if growing in sidewalk cracks or other places where nothing else is growing.

Bindweed

Bindweed is known for choking out native species, and it can be extremely difficult to eliminate from your yard. Marty Baldwin

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: Climbs to 6 feet or more

Where It Grows: Landscape and garden areas in sun

Appearance: Identify this garden weed by its arrowhead-shape leaves on twining vines. Bindweed also produces white to pale pink morning glory-type flowers.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent bindweed. Repeatedly pull or cut down growing bindweed plants and/or spot treat with a nonselective herbicide designed to kill roots, not just above-ground growth.

White Clover

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: 8-10 inches tall, 12 inches wide

Where It Grows: Lawn, landscape, and garden areas in sun to partial shade

Appearance: White clover has three-lobe leaves and round white flower clusters. The plants quickly spread outward to form dense mats of foliage.

Control: Mulch your garden beds to prevent white clover in landscape areas. Use an iron-based herbicide to get rid of clover growing in lawns or dig out the weeds in garden beds.

Test Garden Tip: Clover adds nitrogen to the soil plus the flowers feed many pollinators so some gardeners use this plant to create a more environmentally friendly lawn.

Nutsedge

Type: Grass-like perennial

Size: 2 feet tall, 1 foot wide

Where It Grows: Lawn, landscape, or garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: Nutsedge has slender, grassy leaves, triangular stems, and small, nutlike tubers on the root system. When these weeds pop up in lawns, they often grow faster than turf grass, so they are easy to spot.

Control: Mulch garden areas in spring to help prevent nutsedge. Plants are easy to pull up by hand, but it will take repeated weeding to get rid of an infestation. Various herbicides are labeled for use on nutsedge in lawns but it is important to use the right one for the type of turf grass you have to avoid damaging it.

Creeping Charlie

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: 4 inches tall, several feet wide

Where It Grows: Shady lawn, landscape, or garden areas

Appearance: Identify this lawn weed and groundcover by its scalloped leaves, creeping stems, and clusters of purple flowers in late spring.

Control: Mulch garden areas in spring to prevent creeping charlie. Pull plants by hand or spray with a postemergence herbicide in spring or fall.

Lamb’s-Quarter

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: Up to 4 feet tall and 18 inches wide

Where It Grows: Landscape and garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: Lamb’s-quarters has scalloped, triangular leaves with gray undersides.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent lamb’s-quarter. Pull weed plants by hand or use a postemergence herbicide.

Plantain

Plantain weeds like hard, densely packed soil; loosen it with a hoe before trying to pull them out. Denny Schrock

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: Up to 8 inches tall and 12 inches wide

Where It Grows: Moist lawn and garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: When you’re identifying weeds in your garden, if you spot broad, flat, oval-shape leaves arranged in a low rosette, you’ve likely found a Plantain.

Control: Mulch to prevent plantains growing in the garden. Pull these weeds by hand or use a postemergence herbicide in lawns.

Dayflower

Type: Annual grass relative

Size: Up to 30 inches tall and wide

Where It Grows: Sunny or shady landscape areas

Appearance: Dayflowers have dark green leaves sprouting from a stem and brilliant blue flowers through the summer.

Control: Mulch the garden to prevent weeds or use a preemergence herbicide in spring. Pull weeds by hand or spot-treat with a nonselective postemergence herbicide.

Purslane

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: Up to 6 inches tall and 2 feet wide

Where it grows: Dry, sunny landscape and garden areas

Appearance: Identify this weed groundcover by its fleshy, dark green leaves and small yellow flowers at the ends of the stems.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent purslane or use a preemergence herbicide in the spring. Pull plants by hand or spot-treat with a nonselective postemergence herbicide.

Velvetleaf

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: Up to 6 feet tall and 3 feet wide

Where It Grows: Fertile, sunny landscape and garden areas

Appearance: Velvetleaf gets its name because of its large, velvety heart-shape leaves up to 10 inches across. The weed blooms with yellow flowers in summer.

Weed Control: Mulch your garden to prevent velvetleaf or use a preemergence herbicide in spring. Pull existing plants by hand or use a postemergence herbicide.

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Wild Violet

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: 6 inches tall, 6 inches wide

Where It Grows: Shady lawn, landscape, or garden areas

Appearance: Wild violet is a groundcover with heart-shape leaves and purple flowers in late spring.

Control: Mulch garden beds in spring to prevent wild violet. Pull weeds by hand or spray with a postemergence herbicide in spring or fall.

Test Garden Tip: This plant is sometimes grown as an ornamental in shade gardens.

Smartweed

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: Up to 42 inches tall and 30 inches wide

Where It Grows: Sunny landscape and garden areas

Appearance: Identify garden weeds like smartweed by its lance-shape leaves often marked with purple chevrons. It’s an upright plant with pink or white flowers in summer and fall.

Control: To prevent this weed, mulch garden beds in spring. Pull plants by hand or apply a postemergence herbicide once it grows.

Test Garden Tip: This weed is native to areas of North America. Unlike many exotic weeds, it supports local wildlife.

Quickweed

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: Up to 2 feet tall and wide

Where It Grows: Sunny landscape and garden areas

Appearance: Quickweed has jagged, hairy leaves and small white daisy-shape flowers in summer.

Control: Use a mulch or a preemergence herbicide in spring to prevent quickweed. If plants do grow, pull them by hand or spot-treat them with a postemergence herbicide.

Pigweed

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: 6 feet tall, 2 feet wide

Where it grows: Sunny landscape or garden areas

Appearance: Pigweeds are tall plants with a taproot. Identify weeds by their hairy-looking clusters of green flowers (though some varieties are grown as annuals).

Control: Mulch garden areas in spring to prevent pigweed or use a preemergence herbicide in spring. Pull weeds by hand or spray with a postemergence weed killer.

Canada Thistle

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: Up to 6 feet tall and 3 feet wide

Where It Grows: Sunny lawn, landscape, or garden areas

Appearance: Canada thistle has spiny, gray-green leaves, and purple flowers.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent it in landscape areas. Use a postemergence herbicide in lawns in spring or fall, or dig the weed out by hand.

Test Garden Tip: Thistle has an extensive root system that can grow several feet out from the main plant.

Knotweed

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: Up to 8 inches tall and 2 feet wide

Where It Grows: Sunny or partly shaded lawn, landscape, or garden areas

Appearance: Knotweed is an invasive groundcover with blue-green leaves sparsely appearing on long stems.

Control: Prevent knotweed with a deep layer of mulch or apply a preemergence herbicide in spring. Once the plant grows, hand-pull or spot-treat it with a nonselective weed killer.

Pokeweed

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: Up to 10 feet tall and 2 feet wide

Where It Grows: Sunny landscape or garden areas

Appearance: Identify this garden weed by its light green leaves, clusters of white flowers, and dark purple berries.

Control: Prevent pokeweed with a deep layer of mulch. Once the plant grows, hand-pull or spot-treat it with an herbicide.

Poison Ivy

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: Up to 15 feet tall and wide

Where It Grows: Sunny or shady landscape or garden areas

Appearance: Poison ivy can be a vine, shrub, or groundcover. The weed has leaves divided into three leaflets and can sprout clusters of green berries.

Control: Prevent poison ivy with a deep layer of mulch. If the weed starts to grow in your yard, spot-treat it with an herbicide or wrap your hand in a plastic bag, pull the plant up, roots and all, and carefully invert the plastic bag around the plant, seal, and throw away.

Test Garden Tip: The plant contains oils that cause a severe allergic skin reaction in many people when touched. These oils are present even on dead leaves and can become airborne and inhaled if the plant is burned.

Black Nightshade

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: 2 feet tall, 2 feet wide

Where It Grows: Landscape or garden areas with rich soil in sun or shade

Appearance: Black nightshade can be a bushy or climbing plant with white or purple flowers and purple or red fruits.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent black nightshade. Pull the weed by hand or treat with a postemergence herbicide.

Test Garden Tip: All parts of this plant are poisonous (including the fruits) if swallowed.

Black Medic

Type: Broadleaf annual or short-lived perennial

Size: 1-2 feet tall, 1 foot wide

Where It Grows: Poor, dry, soil in full sun

Appearance: Identify this garden weed by its clover-type leaves and small, yellow flowers. It grows as a dense mat, thanks to its creeping stems.

Control: Mulch to prevent black medic in gardens. Pull or dig out weeds by hand or use a postemergence herbicide. Discourage it by keeping the soil well watered and amended with organic matter (such as compost).

Quackgrass

Type: Grassy perennial

Size: Up to 3 feet tall and several feet wide

Where It Grows: Landscape and garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: This garden weed has wheatlike flower spikes, which appear above slender clumps of grassy foliage.

Control: Mulch your garden well to prevent quackgrass. Dig plants out by hand, being sure to remove every bit of root. Spot treat with a nonselective weed killer.

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: Up to 4 feet tall and 2 feet wide

Where It Grows: Landscape and garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: Dock produces large, wavy-edge leaves and large seed heads covered with brown seeds.

Control: Mulch to prevent dock. Pull and dig up plants or treat with a postemergence herbicide.

Henbit

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: Up to 12 inches tall and wide

Where It Grows: Lawn, landscape, and garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: This lawn weed is a low, creeping plant with scallop-edge leaves and purple flowers.

Control: Mulch to prevent henbit in gardens or use preemergence herbicide in spring. Pull plants by hand or treat in lawns with a broadleaf, postemergence herbicide.

Fleabane

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: 2 feet tall and 18 inches wide

Where It Grows: Landscape and garden areas in sun to partial shade

Appearance: Fleabane has slender leaves attached to an upright, branching stem. It produces puffy white to pale lavender daisies.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent fleabane or use a preemergence herbicide in spring. Pull plants by hand or spot-treat with a postemergence herbicide.

Nettle

Stinging nettle can resprout from rhizomes but also hurt your hands, so wear garden gloves when dealing with this weed. Denny Schrock

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: Up to 6 feet tall and 3 feet wide

Where It Grows: Garden areas with rich, moist soil

Appearance: This garden weed has sawtooth-edge leaves and yellowish flower clusters covered with stinging hairs.

Control: Mulch to prevent nettle. Dig out weeds or treat with a postemergence herbicide.

Test Garden Tip: Always wear gloves when working around this plant (the sharp hairs can irritate skin).

Prostrate Spurge

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: 3 inches tall, 18 inches wide

Where It Grows: Lawn, landscape, and garden areas with dry soil

Appearance: Green or purple-blushed leaves of prostrate spurge form dense mats.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent prostrate spurge or use a preemergence herbicide in lawns. Pull weeds when young or spot-treat with a postemergence herbicide.

Chickweed

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: 6 inches tall, 12 inches wide

Where It Grows: Lawn, garden, and landscape areas with rich, moist soil in sun or shade

Appearance: This garden and lawn weed creates lush green mats studded with small, star-shape flowers.

Control: Mulch to prevent chickweed in gardens or use a preemergence herbicide in early spring. Pull weeds by hand.

Musk Thistle

Type: Broadleaf biennial

Size: Up to 6 feet tall and 18 inches wide

Where It Grows: Landscape and garden areas in full sun

Appearance: Musk thistle has prickly leaves growing off of tall stems topped by heavy two inch purple flowers.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent musk thistle. Use a postemergence herbicide or dig the weed out by hand.

Ragweed

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: Up to 4 feet tall and 2 feet wide

Where It Grows: Landscape and garden areas in sun or partial shade

Appearance: Ragweed has finely cut green leaves that are almost fern-like.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent ragweed. Use a postemergence herbicide or pull it out by hand.

Yellow Sweet Clover

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: 1-3 feet tall, 12-18 inches wide

Where It Grows: Landscape and garden areas

Appearance: Identify this garden weed by its lanky branches, clover-like leaves, and fragrant yellow flowers.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent yellow sweet clover. Pull plants by hand or spot-treat with a postemergence herbicide.

Yellow Salsify

Type: Broadleaf biennial or short-lived perennial

Size: Up to 3 feet tall and 2 feet wide

Where It Grows: Sunny landscape and garden areas

Appearance: Spot yellow salsify by its gray-green leaves. Yellow flowers on the plant are followed by large puffballs of seeds.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent yellow salsify. Pull plants by hand or treat with a postemergence herbicide.